Advertisement

Axiomathes

, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 127–137 | Cite as

On Intrinsic Information Content of the Physical Mind in Quantized Space: Against Externalism

  • R. R. PoznanskiEmail author
  • L. A. Cacha
  • M. A. Tengku
  • A. L. Ahmad Zubaidi
  • S. Hussain
  • J. Ali
  • J. A. Tuszynski
Original Paper
  • 46 Downloads

Abstract

If the physical mind is located in quantized space of the brain then how does the physical mind become the self? This remains an unresolved problem. It can be restated as how mental representations or mental states get their informational contents, and of doing so in terms of the natural functions brain states have? We call these natural brain functions not teleosemantic functions, but rather teleological functions. This is because teleosemantics portrays mental representations which must have informational contents that track “operational explanations of cognitive capacities” while teleological functions (or “teleofunctions”) do not as they are hidden in quantized space, suggesting that mind is physical. Specifically teleonomic capacities have been built into us by natural selection, which naturally leads to a teleogical notion of function. Our claim is that teleofunctionality  as unification of mental states has natural functions that carry intrinsic dispositions that may be broadly defined as ‘subjectivity’ or intrinsic information content of mental states. Mental states have intrinsic dispositions to change their functions, producing correspondences to the world that includes further layers of subtlety hidden in quantized space. How does intrinsic information self-replicate content in cases of mental misrepresentation? The putative special virtue of teleosemantics and its ability to give a theory of error through ‘uncertainty’ is discussed based on a teleological functionalist epistemology.

Keywords

Mental states Teleosemantics Teleological functions Teleonomic emergence Physical mind Subjectivity Nonreductive physicalism Dialectical materialism 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We acknowledge the comments of Alfredo Pereira and Michael Spivey.

References

  1. Arbib MA, Erdi P, Szentagothai J (1998) Neural organization: structure, function & dynamics. MIT Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  2. Atkins P, Friedman R (2005) Molecular quantum mechanics. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  3. Baars BJ, Edelman DB (2012) Conscious, biology and quantum hypotheses. Phys Life Rev 9:285–294CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Baluška F, Yokawa K, Mancuso S, Baverstock K (2016) Understanding of anesthesia-why consciousness is essential for life and not based on genes. Commun Integr Biol 9:e1238118CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bercovich D, Goodman G, Cacha LA, Poznanski RR (2017) The two-brain hypothesis: implications for consciousness. In: Poznanski RR, Tuszynski JA, Feinberg TE (eds) Biophysics of consciousness: a foundational approach. World Scientific, SingaporeGoogle Scholar
  6. Bohm DJ (1990) A new theory of the relationship of mind and matter. Philos Psychol 3:271–286CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Bokkon I, Salari V (2010) Information storing by biomagnetites. J Biol Phys 36:109–120CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Carruthers P, Veillet B (2007) The phenomenal concept strategy. J Conscious Stud 14:9–10Google Scholar
  9. Chalmers DJ (1995) Facing up to the problem of consciousness. J Conscious Stud 2:200–219Google Scholar
  10. Chalmers DJ (1996) The conscious mind: in search of a fundamental theory. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  11. Chalmers DJ (2006) Phenomenal concepts and the explanatory gap. In: Alter T, Walter S (eds) Phenomenal concepts and phenomenal knowledge: new essays on consciousness and physicalism. Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp 167–194Google Scholar
  12. Clarke PGH (2014) Neuroscience, quantum indeterminism and the Cartesian soul. Brain Cogn 84:109–117CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Goodman G, Poznanski RR, Cacha LA, Bercovich D (2015) The two-brains hypothesis: towards a guide for brain-brain and brain-machine interfaces. J Integr Neurosci 14:281–293CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Hagan S, Hirafuji M (1999) The interface in a mixed quantum/classical model of brain function. In: Hameroff SR, Kaszniak AW, Chalmers DJ (eds) Toward a science of consciousness III: the third Tucson discussions and debates. MIT Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  15. Hameroff SR (2007) The brain is both neurocomputer and quantum computer. Cogn Sci 31:1–11CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Hameroff SR (2010) The ‘conscious pilot’- dendritic synchrony moves through the brain to mediate consciousness. J Biol Phys 36:71–93CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Hameroff SR, Penrose R (2017) Consciousness in the universe: an updated review of the “ORCH OR” theory. In: Poznanski RR, Tuszynski JA, Feinberg TE (eds) Biophysics of consciousness: a foundational approach. World Scientific, SingaporeGoogle Scholar
  18. Holcman D, Yuste R (2015) The new nanophysiology: regulation of ionic flow in neuronal subcompartments. Nat Rev Neurosci 16:685–692CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Ito M (2000) Integration in the brain. In: Koizumi H (ed) The frontiers of mind-brain science and its practical applications II. Hitachi Ltd., TokyoGoogle Scholar
  20. Kim J (1989) The myth of nonreductive materialism. Proc Am Philos Assoc 63:31–47CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Levin J (2006) What is a phenomenal concept? In: Alter T, Walter S (eds) Phenomenal concepts and phenomenal knowledge. New essays on consciousness and physicalism. Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp 87–110Google Scholar
  22. Levine J (1983) Materialism and qualia: the explanatory gap. Pac Philos Q 64:354–361CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Lycan WG (1999) The continuity of levels of nature. In: Lycan WG (ed) Mind and cognition, 2nd edn. Blackwell Publishers, MaldenGoogle Scholar
  24. Macdonald G, Papineau D (2006) Teleosemantics: new philosophical essays. Clarendon Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  25. Mallet J, Feinberg TE (2017) Consciousness is not inherent in but emergent from life. Anim Sentience 1(11):15Google Scholar
  26. Mayr E (1974) Teleological and teleonomic: a new analysis. Boston Stud Philos Sci 14:91–117CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Nunez PL (2016) The neuroscience of consciousness: exploring the complexity of brain, mind, and self. Prometheus Books, AmherstGoogle Scholar
  28. Penrose R (1989) The emperor’s new mind: concerning computers, minds and the laws of physics. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  29. Pereira A (2003) The quantum mind/classical brain problem. NeuroQuantology 1:94–118Google Scholar
  30. Pereira A (2007) Astrocyte-trapped calcium ions: the hypothesis of a quantum-like conscious protectorate. Quantum Biosyst 2:80–92Google Scholar
  31. Pereira A, Vimal RLP, Pregnolato M (2017) Can qualitative biophysics solve the hard problem? In: Poznanski RR, Tuszynski JA, Feinberg TE (eds) Biophysics of consciousness: a foundational approach. World Scientific, SingaporeGoogle Scholar
  32. Pratt D (2003) Consciousness, causality, and quantum physics. NeuroQuantology 1:58–67Google Scholar
  33. Pribram KH (1991) Brain and perception: holonomy and structure in figural processing. Lawrence Erlbaum, New JerseyGoogle Scholar
  34. Pylkkänen P (2017) Is there room in quantum ontology for a genuine causal role of consciousness? In: Khrennikov A, Haven E (eds) The Palgrave handbook of quantum models in social science. Palgrave Macmillan, BasingstokeGoogle Scholar
  35. Seager W (2013) Classical levels, Russellian monism and the implicate order. Found Phys 43:548–567CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Searle JR (2000) Consciousness. Annu Rev Neurosci 25:557–578CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Searle JR (2004) Biological naturalism. In: Velmans M, Schneider S (eds) The Blackwell companion to consciousness. Blackwell, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  38. Searle JR (2007) Biological naturalism. In: Velmans M, Schneider S (eds) The Blackwell companion to consciousness. Blackwell, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  39. Siekevitz P, Kasischke KA, Webb WW (2004) Producing neuronal energy. Science 306:410–411CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Solms M (2017) Consciousness by surprise. In: Poznanski RR, Tuszynski JA, Feinberg TE (eds) Biophysics of consciousness: a foundational approach. World Scientific, SingaporeGoogle Scholar
  41. Spivey M (2007) The continuity of mind. Oxford University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  42. Szasz A, Vincze G, Andocs G, Szasz O (2009) Do field-free electromagnetic potentials play a role in biology? Electromagn Biol Med 28:135–147CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Tononi G (2008) Consciousness as integrated information: a provisional manifesto. Biol Bull 215:216–242CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Tononi G, Edelman GM (1998) Consciousness and complexity. Science 282:1846–1851CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Tressoldi P, Facco E, Lucangeli D (2016) Emergence of qualia from brain activity or from an interaction of proto-consciousness with the brain: which one is the weirder? Available evidence and a research agenda. Sci Open Res.  https://doi.org/10.14293/s2199-1006.1.sor-socsci.ayo54b.v1 Google Scholar
  46. Vincent JL, Patel GH, Fox MD, Snyder AZ, Baker JT, Van Essen DC, Zempel JM, Snyder LH, Corbetta M, Raichle ME (2007) Intrinsic functional architecture in the anaesthetized monkey brain. Nature 447:83–86CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Woolf NJ, Priel A, Tuszynski JA (2009) Nanoneuroscience structural and functional roles of the neuronal cytoskeleton in health and disease. Springer, HeidelbergGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. R. Poznanski
    • 1
    Email author
  • L. A. Cacha
    • 1
  • M. A. Tengku
    • 1
  • A. L. Ahmad Zubaidi
    • 2
  • S. Hussain
    • 3
  • J. Ali
    • 4
  • J. A. Tuszynski
    • 5
    • 6
  1. 1.I-CODEUniversiti Sultan Zainal AbidinKuala NerusMalaysia
  2. 2.Faculty of MedicineUniversiti Sultan Zainal AbidinKuala NerusMalaysia
  3. 3.Centre for Biomedical EngineeringUniversiti Teknologi MalaysiaJohor BahruMalaysia
  4. 4.Laser CentreUniversiti Teknologi MalaysiaJohor BahruMalaysia
  5. 5.Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and DentistryUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  6. 6.Department of Mechanical and Aerospace EngineeringPolitecnico di TorinoTurinItaly

Personalised recommendations