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Retrieval of atmospheric mass densities in lower thermosphere below 200 km from precise orbit of re-entry object CZ-3B R/B by analytical and numerical methods

  • Ming-Jiang Zhang
  • Hong-Bo Wang
  • Chang-Yin Zhao
  • Jian-Ning Xiong
  • Dong Wei
  • Wei Zhang
  • Sheng-Xian Yu
Original Article
  • 290 Downloads

Abstract

Taking the re-entry object CZ-3B R/B (COSPAR identifier 2012-018D, NORAD catalog number 38253) as an example, retrieval of atmospheric mass densities in lower thermosphere below 200 km from its rebuilt precise orbit is studied in this paper. Two methodologies, i.e. analytical and numerical methods, are adopted in the retrieval. Basic principles of these two methodologies are briefly introduced. Based on the short-arc sparse observational data accumulated in the high accuracy re-entry prediction, orbit determinations of re-entry object CZ-3B R/B are performed sectionally, and then its precise orbit is rebuilt. According to the orbit theory, the variation of orbital semi-major axis of re-entry object CZ-3B R/B induced by atmospheric drag perturbation only is derived from the rebuilt precise orbit. In the derivation of secular change of the orbital semi-major axis of re-entry object CZ-3B R/B induced by atmospheric drag perturbation only, the time-span is set as one minute tentatively. And then retrieval results of atmospheric mass densities in lower thermosphere below 200 km by analytical and numerical methods are presented, as well as their bias deviations from the calculated results of the NRLMSISE-00 empirical model of the atmosphere. Setting bias deviation bands, the corresponding ‘confidence coefficients’ of the retrieved atmospheric mass densities with respect to the model values are given. Average bias deviations of the retrieved atmospheric mass densities by analytical and numerical methods from the model values are also calculated respectively. On the whole, the retrieved atmospheric mass densities by numerical method approach to the model values more closely; the differences between the retrieved results and the model values are relatively smaller at the peaks of atmospheric mass densities than the other places.

Keywords

Atmospheric mass density Precise orbit Re-entry object Analytical method Numerical method 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work is supported by the Youth Innovation Promotion Association CAS (Grant No. 2017367) and the Key Program of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11533010). We thank anonymous reviewer for the valuable comments that helped to substantially improve the manuscript.

Supplementary material

10509_2018_3396_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (251 kb)
(PDF 251 kB)

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ming-Jiang Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hong-Bo Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chang-Yin Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jian-Ning Xiong
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dong Wei
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wei Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sheng-Xian Yu
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Purple Mountain ObservatoryChinese Academy of SciencesNanjingChina
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Space Object and Debris ObservationPMO, CASNanjingChina

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