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Aquaculture International

, Volume 27, Issue 5, pp 1343–1352 | Cite as

Development of growth-promoting substances for diatoms (Navicula sp.)

  • Junseong Kim
  • Eun-A Kim
  • Hyun-Sung Yang
  • Do-Hyung Kang
  • Hyun-Soo Kim
  • Seo-Young Kim
  • You-Jin JeonEmail author
  • Soo-Jin HeoEmail author
Article
  • 33 Downloads

Abstract

Abalone production in Korea has reached 5000 metric tonnes (MT) since 2000 and has been consistently increasing to reach 10,000 MT in 2015. Abalone fisheries are mainly seen in Wando on the south coast of Korea, where seaweed aquaculture has been majorly conducted. Mass mortality of abalone spats is considered a major problem in abalone fisheries and is caused by changes in environmental factors and food availability (including availability of benthic diatoms). However, it is difficult to supply sufficient quantities of benthic diatoms to post-larvae abalone. Therefore, we explored the development of growth-promoting substances for diatoms Navicula sp. and experimentally mixed several substances to enhance the growth of diatoms. In this study, we used alginic acid, fucoidan, Scytosiphon lomentaria, Ecklonia cava, Ecklonia cava processing byproduct (i.e., Ecklonia cava–boiled extracts, EBE), and Porphyra tenera. In addition, EBE, phosphate fertilizer (PF), nitrogenous manure (NM), and sodium silicate (SS) were mixed to determine the optimal composition of growth substances. The growth of diatoms significantly increased under EBE exposure, compared with other substances. During this study, attempts were made to identify the optimal composition of mixtures of PF, NM, and SS with that of EBE (1:1:1:1). The Navicula sp. growth-promoting substance (NGPS) mixture enhanced Navicula sp. growth by 150% compared with existing market products. We were therefore able to develop a substance that promotes the growth of diatoms, thereby facilitating the cultivation of healthy abalone with reduced mortality.

Keywords

Navicula sp. Abalone spats Diatom Ecklonia cava 

Notes

Funding information

This research was supported by a research grants from the Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology (PE99722).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Junseong Kim
    • 1
  • Eun-A Kim
    • 1
  • Hyun-Sung Yang
    • 1
  • Do-Hyung Kang
    • 1
  • Hyun-Soo Kim
    • 2
  • Seo-Young Kim
    • 2
  • You-Jin Jeon
    • 2
    Email author
  • Soo-Jin Heo
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Jeju Research InstituteKorea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology (KIOST)JejuRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Marine Life ScienceJeju National UniversityJejuRepublic of Korea

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