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Heart Rate Variability is Associated with Memory in Females

  • Gisela Nassralla Morandi
  • Shih-Hsien LinEmail author
  • Che-Wei Lin
  • Tzung Lieh Yeh
  • Ching-Lin Chu
  • I Hui Lee
  • Mei Hung Chi
  • Kao Chin Chen
  • Po See Chen
  • Yen Kuang Yang
Article

Abstract

Research into the association between heart rate variability (HRV) and cognitive function is scarce, particularly with regard to gender differences. HRV in 182 healthy volunteers was assessed by the root mean square of the successive difference (RMSSD) and spectrum analysis, while the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) was used to determine memory function. Robust and significant associations were found to exist between HRV (RMSSD and high-frequency HRV) and domains of the WMS-R in females. Caution should therefore be taken to control for gender when conducting studies on the relationships between HRV and cognitive variables.

Keywords

Heart rate variability (HRV) Memory Autonomic nervous system (ANS) Gender 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was funded by the National Science Council of Taiwan (NSC 93-2314-B-006-107, NSC 97-2314-B-006-006-MY3, NSC 100-2314-B-006-041-MY3, and NSC 101-2314-B-006-065) and the Atomic Energy Council of Taiwan (NSC 99-NU-E-006-003). The authors thank Mr. Chien Ting Lin and Ms. Tsai Hua Chang of the Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, in addition to the participants of this study.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest in relation to this work. The funders had no role in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Ethical Approval

The study protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board at National Cheng Kung University Hospital. All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the Ethical Standards of the Institutional and/or National Research Committee and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Written informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gisela Nassralla Morandi
    • 1
  • Shih-Hsien Lin
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Che-Wei Lin
    • 4
  • Tzung Lieh Yeh
    • 2
  • Ching-Lin Chu
    • 2
    • 3
  • I Hui Lee
    • 2
  • Mei Hung Chi
    • 2
  • Kao Chin Chen
    • 2
  • Po See Chen
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yen Kuang Yang
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of MedicineFaculdade de ciências médicas e da saúde (FCMS)-PUC-SPSorocabaBrazil
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of MedicineNational Cheng Kung UniversityTainanTaiwan
  3. 3.Institute of Behavioral Medicine, College of MedicineNational Cheng Kung UniversityTainanTaiwan
  4. 4.Department of BioMedical EngineeringNational Cheng Kung UniversityTainanTaiwan
  5. 5.Department of PsychiatryNational Cheng Kung University HospitalYunlinTaiwan

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