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Antonie van Leeuwenhoek

, Volume 112, Issue 8, pp 1147–1159 | Cite as

Description of Janibacter massiliensis sp. nov., cultured from the vaginal discharge of a patient with bacterial vaginosis

  • Mossaab Maaloum
  • Khoudia Diop
  • Awa Diop
  • Hussein Anani
  • Enora Tomei
  • Magali Richez
  • Jaishriram Rathored
  • Florence Bretelle
  • Didier Raoult
  • Florence Fenollar
  • Pierre-Edouard FournierEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Strain Marseille-P4121T was isolated from a vaginal sample of a 45-year-old French woman with bacterial vaginosis. It is a Gram-positive, asporogenous, non-motile and aerobic bacterium. Strain Marseille-P4121T exhibits 98.2% 16S rRNA sequence similarity with Janibacter alkaliphilus strain SCSIO 10480T, a phylogenetically closely related species with standing in nomenclature. Its major fatty acids were identified as C18:1ω9 (34.4%), C16:0 (30.1%), and C18:0 (19%). The draft genome size of strain Marseille-P4121T is 2,452,608 bp long with a 72.5% G+C content and contains 2351 protein-coding genes and 49 RNA genes including 3 rRNA genes. We propose that strain Marseille-P4121T (= CECT 9671T = CSUR P4121T) is the type strain of the new species Janibacter massiliensis sp. nov.

Keywords

Bacterial vaginosis Culturomics Janibacter massiliensis Taxonogenomics Vaginal microbiota 

Abbreviations

CSUR

Collection de souches de l’Unité des Rickettsies

CECT

Colección española de cultivos tipo

MALDI-TOF

Matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight

TE buffer

Tris-EDTA buffer

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported by the Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire (IHU) Méditerranée Infection, the National Research Agency under the program «Investissements d’avenir», reference ANR-10-IAHU-03, the Région Provence Alpes Côte d’Azur and the European funding FEDER PRIMI.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflit of interest.

Supplementary material

10482_2019_1247_MOESM1_ESM.docx (35 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 35 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mossaab Maaloum
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Khoudia Diop
    • 1
    • 2
  • Awa Diop
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hussein Anani
    • 1
    • 2
  • Enora Tomei
    • 1
  • Magali Richez
    • 4
  • Jaishriram Rathored
    • 2
    • 4
  • Florence Bretelle
    • 4
    • 5
  • Didier Raoult
    • 2
    • 4
    • 6
  • Florence Fenollar
    • 1
    • 2
  • Pierre-Edouard Fournier
    • 1
    • 2
    • 7
    Email author
  1. 1.Aix Marseille Univ, IRD, AP-HM, SSA, VITROMEMarseilleFrance
  2. 2.IHU Méditerranée InfectionMarseilleFrance
  3. 3.Faculty of Sciences Ben M’sik, Laboratory of Biology and HealthHassan II University, 10CasablancaMorocco
  4. 4.Aix-Marseille Univ, IRD, AP-HM, MEPHIMarseilleFrance
  5. 5.Department of Gynecology and ObstetricsGynépole, Hôpital Nord, AP-HMMarseilleFrance
  6. 6.Special Infectious Agents Unit, King Fahd Medical Research CenterKing Abdulaziz UniversityJeddahSaudi Arabia
  7. 7.Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire Méditerranée-InfectionMarseille Cedex 05France

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