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Annals of Operations Research

, Volume 283, Issue 1–2, pp 1001–1044 | Cite as

Humanitarian supply chain management: a thematic literature review and future directions of research

  • Abhishek Behl
  • Pankaj DuttaEmail author
S.I. : Applications of OR in Disaster Relief Operations, Part II

Abstract

The field of supply chain management has been extensively studied, while its role in disaster relief operations has received limited contributions. Recent dedicated special issues on Humanitarian Operations and Supply Chain Management (HOSCM) and a dedicated Journal focusing on humanitarian logistics and supply chain management clearly indicate the growing popularity of the HOSCM literature. The purpose of our current study is to undertake an extensive review of extant literature published in operations and supply chain management journals as well as popular interdisciplinary journals. A review of 362 papers published between 2011 and 2017 provides a thematic outline of the study. The study pivots around nine key themes, which have gained prominent attention from HOSCM scholars, and draws a roadmap from reviewing earlier review papers to performance evaluation of HOSCM related studies. Some of the key themes include humanitarian logistics, theory focused research, case studies, mathematical models, humanitarian supply chain properties and resources needed for efficient and effective management of humanitarian operations. Finally, our study offers several research directions which may take the existing debates to a next level.

Keywords

Humanitarian supply chain management Humanitarian logistics Disaster management Thematic literature review 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the reviewers who have significantly contributed towards improving the quality of the manuscript. We would also like to extend our gratitude to Guest Editors who have also added their valuable comments in shaping up the manuscript right from the beginning. We are also thankful to the language editors who have helped us improve the standard of writing and communication of the ideas systematically.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Shailesh J. Mehta School of ManagementIndian Institute of Technology BombayPowai, MumbaiIndia

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