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AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 23, Issue 4, pp 875–882 | Cite as

Cost of Community-Based HIV Testing Activities to Reach Saturation in Botswana

  • Arielle LasryEmail author
  • Pamela Bachanas
  • Chutima Suraratdecha
  • Mary Grace Alwano
  • Stephanie Behel
  • Sherri Pals
  • Lisa Block
  • Janet Moore
Original Paper

Abstract

In Botswana, 85% of persons living with HIV are aware of their status. We performed an economic analysis of HIV testing activities implemented during intensive campaigns, in 11 communities, between April 2015 and March 2016, through the Botswana Combination Prevention Project. The total cost was $1,098,312, or $99,847 per community, with 60% attributable to home-based testing and 40% attributable to mobile testing. The cost per person tested was $44, and $671 per person testing positive (2017 USD). Labor costs comprised 64% of total costs. In areas of high HIV prevalence and treatment coverage, the cost of untargeted home-based testing may be inflated by the efforts required to assess the testing eligibility of clients who are HIV-positive and on ART. Home-based and mobile testing delivered though an intensive community-based campaign allowed the identification of HIV positive persons, who may not access health facilities, at a cost comparable to other studies.

Keywords

HIV HIV testing Cost Economic analysis 

Notes

Disclaimer

The findings and conclusions in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the official position of the funding agencies.

Funding

This project has been supported by the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) under the terms of Cooperative Agreements U2G GH000073 and U2G GH000419.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflicts of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Ethical Approval

The Botswana Combination Prevention Project study was approved by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Institutional Review Board (Protocol #6475) and the Botswana Health Research and Development Committee (HRDC; Institutional Review Board of the Botswana Ministry of Health and Wellness).

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the Botswana Combination Prevention Project.

Supplementary material

10461_2019_2408_MOESM1_ESM.docx (16 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 15 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Global HIV & TBCenter for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA

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