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Electrocardiogram Acquisition During Remote Magnetic Catheter Navigation

  • Jesús E. Dos Reis
  • Paul Soullié
  • Alberto Battaglia
  • Gregory Petitmangin
  • Philip Hoyland
  • Laurent Josseaume
  • Christian de Chillou
  • Freddy Odille
  • Jacques FelblingerEmail author
Article
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Abstract

Electrocardiogram (ECG) acquisition is required during catheter treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. The remote magnetic navigation technology allows the catheter to be moved automatically inside the heart chambers using large external magnets. Each change of position of the catheter requires fast motion of the magnets, therefore magnetic fluxes are created through the ECG cables, causing large distortions of the ECG signals. In this study a novel ECG sensor is proposed for reducing such distortions. The sensor uses short cables to connect the electrodes to the amplification and optical conversion circuit, using a technology similar to that used for magnetic resonance imaging. The proposed sensor was compared to the conventional 12-lead ECG device during various operation modes of the magnets. Quantitative morphological analysis of the different waves of the ECG was performed in two healthy subjects and on a conductivity phantom reproducing various cardiac pathologies. In healthy subjects the beat-to-beat correlation coefficients were improved with the proposed sensor for the PR interval (80–93% vs. 49–89%), QRS complex (93–96% vs. 74–94%), ST segment + T wave (95–98% vs. 67–99%), and whole PQRST wave (82–97% vs. 55–96%). Similar observations were made with the conductive gel in the whole PQRST wave in the pathological morphologies of the ECG for the VT (99% vs. 56–98%), AT (95% vs. 26–89%), STE (96–97% vs. 20–91%) and STD (96% vs. 28–90%). The new sensor might be used for better (uninterrupted) monitoring of the patient during catheter interventions using remote magnetic navigation. It has the potential to improve the robustness and/or duration of certain clinical procedures such as ventricular tachycardia ablation.

Keywords

Electrocardiography (ECG) Remote magnetic navigation (RMN) Cardiac electrophysiology Electromagnetic compatibility Optical sensor 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This study was funded by the French “Investments for the Future” program under Grant Number ANR-15-RHU-0004. The authors also thank INSERM, CPER 2007–2013, Région Lorraine and FEDER for the funding of the Niobe Magnetic Navigation System, Stereotaxis Inc..

Conflict of interest

J.D.R. and G.M. are Schiller employees. P.H. is a Biosense employee. L.J. is a Stereotaxis employee.

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Copyright information

© Biomedical Engineering Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jesús E. Dos Reis
    • 1
    • 2
  • Paul Soullié
    • 1
  • Alberto Battaglia
    • 3
    • 4
  • Gregory Petitmangin
    • 2
  • Philip Hoyland
    • 1
    • 5
  • Laurent Josseaume
    • 6
  • Christian de Chillou
    • 1
    • 4
  • Freddy Odille
    • 1
    • 3
  • Jacques Felblinger
    • 1
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.IADI, INSERM, U1254 and Université de LorraineNancyFrance
  2. 2.Schiller Medical SASWissembourgFrance
  3. 3.CIC-IT 1433, INSERM, Université de Lorraine and CHRU NancyNancyFrance
  4. 4.Department of CardiologyCHRU de NancyNancyFrance
  5. 5.Biosense Webster France, Johnson & JohnsonIssy-les-MoulineauxFrance
  6. 6.Stereotaxis Inc.St. LouisUSA

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