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Esophagus

, Volume 16, Issue 4, pp 413–417 | Cite as

Use of esophageal stent for the treatment of postoperative gastrointestinal–airway fistula after esophagectomy

  • Koichi Okamoto
  • Itasu NinomiyaEmail author
  • Yuta Fujiwara
  • Ichitaro Mochizuki
  • Tatsuya Aoki
  • Takahisa Yamaguchi
  • Shiro Terai
  • Shinichi Nakanuma
  • Jun Kinoshita
  • Isamu Makino
  • Keishi Nakamura
  • Tomoharu Miyashita
  • Hidehiro Tajima
  • Hiroyuki Takamura
  • Sachio Fushida
  • Tetsuo Ohta
How I Do It

Abstract

A gastrointestinal–airway fistula (GAF) after esophagectomy is a very serious postoperative complication that can cause severe respiratory complications due to digestive juice inflow. Generally, GAF is managed by invasive surgical treatment; less-invasive treatment has yet to be established. We performed esophageal stent placement (ESP) in three cases of GAF after esophagectomy. We assessed the usefulness of ESP through our clinical experience. All GAFs were successfully managed by ESP procedures. After the procedure, the stent positioning and expansion were appropriately evaluated by radiological assessments over time. The stent was removed after endoscopic confirmation of fistula closure on days 8, 23, and 71. Only one patient with a long-term indwelling stent developed a manageable secondary gastrobronchial fistula as a procedure-related complication. In conclusion, ESP was shown to be a less-invasive and effective therapeutic modality for the treatment of GAF.

Keywords

Esophageal stent Esophageal fistula Esophageal cancer 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Angela Morben, DVM, ELS, from Edanz Group (http://www.edanzediting.com/ac), for editing a draft of this manuscript.

Compliance with ethical standards

Ethical Statement

All the procedures were in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional and national) and with the Helsinki Declaration of 1964 and later versions. Informed consent or a substitute for it was obtained from all patients or their guardians, and this work was approved by the ethical committee of our hospital.

Conflict of interest

Koichi Okamoto, Itasu Ninomiya, Yuta Fujiwara, Ichitaro Mochizuki, Tatsuya Aoki, Takahisa Yamaguchi, Shiro Terai, Shinichi Nakanuma, Jun Kinoshita, Isamu Makino, Keishi Nakamura, Tomoharu Miyashita, Hidehiro Tajima, Hiroyuki Takamura, Sachio Fushida, and Tetsuo Ohta declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© The Japan Esophageal Society and Springer 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Koichi Okamoto
    • 1
  • Itasu Ninomiya
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yuta Fujiwara
    • 1
  • Ichitaro Mochizuki
    • 1
  • Tatsuya Aoki
    • 1
  • Takahisa Yamaguchi
    • 1
  • Shiro Terai
    • 1
  • Shinichi Nakanuma
    • 1
  • Jun Kinoshita
    • 1
  • Isamu Makino
    • 1
  • Keishi Nakamura
    • 1
  • Tomoharu Miyashita
    • 1
  • Hidehiro Tajima
    • 1
  • Hiroyuki Takamura
    • 1
  • Sachio Fushida
    • 1
  • Tetsuo Ohta
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Gastroenterological SurgeryKanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan

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