Advertisement

Nitrogen transformation and carbon sequestration in wetland paddy field of Bangladesh

  • Md. Ashraful Alam
  • Md. Mizanur RahmanEmail author
  • Jatish Chandra Biswas
  • Sohela Akhter
  • M. Maniruzzaman
  • Apurba Kanti Choudhury
  • M. Abu Hena Sorwar Jahan
  • Md. Main Uddin Miah
  • Ranjit Sen
  • M. Zia Uddin Kamal
  • Md. Abdul Mannan
  • Humayun Kabir Shiragi
  • Wais Kabir
  • Naveen Kalra
Article

Abstract

Rice-based cropping systems in Bangladesh have received little consideration of changing nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) in soil. Therefore, this study was conducted at the Research Field of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University, Bangladesh, in monsoon to determine release patterns of ammonium–N (NH4+–N) and nitrate–N (NO3–N), C contents of different sized soil fractions and to quantify the rates of C sequestration as influenced by organic amendments and N fertilizer in wetland paddy fields. Rice straw, vermicompost, rice husk biochar, cow dung and poultry manure were applied using 2 t C ha−1 with 0, 100 and 150 N kg ha−1 in a factorial randomized complete block design. Application of different organic materials attributed maximum amount of NH4+–N and NO3–N in soils at 45–60 days after transplanting, while N fertilizer application considering 150 kg N ha−1 provided the maximum amounts of available N. Rice grain yield was found statistically similar between 100 and 150 kg N ha−1. Carbon contents in soils of different sized fractions inconsistently varied with organic and inorganic fertilization and time elapsed. The highest amount of organic C was sequestered in cow dung-treated plots followed by rice straw, rice husk biochar, poultry manure and vermicompost. Nitrogen fertilizer enhanced decomposition of organic materials, and therefore, C sequestration was significantly lower with higher N rates. The study recommends continuous application of organic fertilizers and optimization of N in the tropical and subtropical regions which ultimately either contribute to maintain or increase C sequestration in crop fields.

Keywords

Nitrogen dynamics Organic amendments Rice yield Organic carbon Mineralization Ammonium and nitrate nitrogen 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We impressively acknowledge Krishi Gobeshona Foundation (KGF) for financing this research activity through CRP-II project.

References

  1. Barker DE, Surh NH (1982) Atomic absorption and flame emission spectroscopy. In: Page AL, Miller RH, Keeney DR (eds) Methods of soil analysis, part 2: chemical and microbiological properties. Am Soc Agron and Soil Sci Soc Am, Madison, pp 13–26Google Scholar
  2. Bhattacharyya P, Roy KS, Neogi S, Chakravorti SP, Behera KS, Das KM, Bardhan S, Rao KS (2012) Effect of long-term application of organic amendment on C storage in relation to global warming potential and biological activities in tropical flooded soil planted to rice. Nutr Cycl Agroecosyst 94:273–285CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Brammer H (1996) The geography of the soils of Bangladesh. The University Press Limited, Dahka, pp 132–133Google Scholar
  4. Brar BS, Singh K, Dheri GS, Balwinder K (2013) Carbon sequestration and soil carbon pools in a rice-wheat cropping system: effect of long-term use of inorganic fertilizers and organic manure. Soil Till Res 128:30–36CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bray RH, Kurtz LT (1945) Determination of total organic and available forms of phosphorus in soils. Soil Sci 59:39–45CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bremner JM, Mulvaney CS (1982) Total nitrogen. In: Page AL, Miller RH, Keeney DR (eds) Methods of soil analysis, part 2: chemical and microbiological properties. Am Soc Agron and Soil Sci Soc Am, Madison, pp 595–624Google Scholar
  7. Buresh RJ, Reddy KR, van Kessel C (2008) Nitrogen transformations in submerged soils. Nitrogen in agricultural systems, agronomy monograph 49. American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America, MadisonGoogle Scholar
  8. Cabrera ML, Kissel AD, Vigil MF (2005) Nitrogen mineralization from organic materials: research opportunities. J Environ Qual 34:779CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Cerny J, Balik J, Kulhanek M, Nedved V (2008) The changes in microbial biomass and N in long-term field experiments. Plant Soil Environ 54(5):212–218CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Chakraborty A, Chakraborty K, Chakraborty A, Ghosh S (2011) Effect of long-term fertilizers and manure application on microbial biomass and microbial activity of a tropical agricultural soil. Biol Fert Soils 47(2):227–233CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Fageria NK, Carvalho GD, Santos AB, Ferreira EPB, Knupp AM (2011) Chemistry of lowland rice soils and nutrient availability. Commun Soil Sci Plant Anal 42:1913–1933CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. FRG (2012) Fertilizer recommendation guide. Bangladesh Agricultural Research Council (BARC), Farmgate, DhakaGoogle Scholar
  13. Hossain M, Deb UK (2003) Liberalization of rice sector: Can Bangladesh withstand regional competition? Poster paper presented at PETRRA communication fair held on August 10–11, 2003 at hotel Sheraton, DhakaGoogle Scholar
  14. Hossain MB, Rahman MM, Biswas JC, Miah MMU, Akhter S, Maniruzzaman M, Choudhury A, Ahmed F, Shiragi MHK, Kalra N (2017) Carbon mineralization and carbon dioxide emission from organic matter added soil under different temperature regimes. Int J Recycl Org Wastes Agric 6:311–319CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Islam MZ, Khalequzzaman M, Bashar MK, Ivy NA, Haque MM, Mian MAK (2016) Variability assessment of aromatic and fine rice germplasm in Bangladesh based on quantitative traits. Sci World J.  https://doi.org/10.1155/2016/2796720 Google Scholar
  16. Kabir MS, Salam MU, Chowdhury A, Rahman NMF, Iftekharuddaula KM, Rahman MS, Rashid MH, Dipti SS, Islam A, Latif MA, Islam AKMS, Hossain MM, Nessa B, Ansari TH, Ali MA, Biswas JK (2015) Rice vision for Bangladesh: 2050 and beyond. Bangladesh Rice J 19(2):1–18CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Karim Z, Iqbal A (2001) Impact of land degradation in Bangladesh. Bangladesh Agricultural Research Council, Farmgate Dhaka, pp 60–160Google Scholar
  18. Khalil MI, Rahman MS, Schmidhalter U, Olfs HW (2007) Nitrogen fertilizer–induced mineralization of soil organic C and N in six contrasting soils of Bangladesh. J Plant Nutr Soil Sci 170:210–218CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Kuzyakov Y, Friedel JK, Stahr K (2000) Review of mechanisms and quantification of priming effects. Soil Biol Biochem 32:1485–1498CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Liu E, Yan C, Mei X, Zhang Y, Fan T (2013) Long-term effect of manure and fertilizer on soil organic carbon pools in dry land farming in northwest China. PLoS ONE 8(2):56536CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Manzoni S, Jackson RB, Trofymow JA, Porporato A (2008) The global stoichiometry of litter nitrogen mineralization. Science 321:684–686CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Maynard DG, Kalra YP, Crumbaugh JA (1993) Nitrate and exchangeable ammonium nitrogen. Soil sampling and methods of analysis. CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group, Boca RatonGoogle Scholar
  23. McLean EO (1982) Soil pH and lime requirement. In: Page AL, Miller RH, Keeney DR (eds) Methods of soil analysis, part 2: chemical and microbiological properties. Am Soc Agron and Soil Sci Soc Am, Madison, pp 199–224Google Scholar
  24. Patrick JWH, Mahapatra IC (1968) Transformation and availability to rice of nitrogen and phosphorus in waterlogged soils. Adv Agron 20:323–356CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Ponnamperuma FN (1972) The chemistry of submerged soils. Adv Agron 24:29–96CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Rahman MM (2010) Effect of different organic wastes in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) cultivation. J Environ Sci Nat Resour 3(1):247–251Google Scholar
  27. Rahman MM (2014) Carbon and nitrogen dynamics and carbon sequestration in soils under different residue management. The Agriculturists 12(2):48–55CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Rahman MM, Rahman GKMM, Afrad SI, Islam S (2014) Effect of organic composts in red amaranth and spinach productivity and soil fertility. J Environ Sci Nat Resour 7(2):1–6Google Scholar
  29. Rahman F, Rahman MM, Rahman GKMM, Saleque MA, Hossain ATMS, Miah MG (2016) Effect of organic and inorganic fertilizers and rice straw on carbon sequestration and soil fertility under a rice-rice cropping pattern. Carbon Manage 7(1–2):41–53CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. SAARC (2007) (South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation), statistical data book for agricultural research and development in SAARC countries. SAARC Agricultural Information Centre, BARC complex, Farmgate, DhakaGoogle Scholar
  31. Sahrawat KL (2010) Nitrogen mineralization in lowland rice soils: the role of organic matter quantity and quality. Arch Agron Soil Sci 56(3):337–353CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Taylor LL, Leake JR, Quirk J, Hardy K, Banwart SA, Beerling DJ (2009) Biological weathering and the long-term carbon cycle: integrating mycorrhizal evolution and function into the current paradigm. Geobiology 7:171–191CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Walkley A, Black IA (1934) An examination of the Degtjareff method for determining soil organic matter, and a proposed modification of the chromic soil titration method. Soil Sci 37:29–38CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. White JR, Reddy KR (2001) The effects of select electron acceptors on organic nitrogen mineralization in northern Everglades soils. Soil Sci Soc Am J 65:941–948CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Xie Z, Zhu J, Liu G, Cadisch G, Hasegawa T, Chen C, Zeng Q (2007) Soil organic carbon stocks in China and changes from 1980s to 2000s. Glob Change Biol 13(9):1989–2007CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Yang C, Yang L, Ouyang Z (2005) Organic carbon and its fractions in paddy soil as affected by different nutrient and water regimes. Geoderma 124(1):133–142CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Zhang W, Xu M, Wang X, Huang Q, Nie J, Li Z, Lee KB (2012) Effects of organic amendments on soil carbon sequestration in paddy fields of subtropical China. J Soils Sed 12(4):457–470CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The International Society of Paddy and Water Environment Engineering 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Md. Ashraful Alam
    • 1
  • Md. Mizanur Rahman
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jatish Chandra Biswas
    • 2
  • Sohela Akhter
    • 3
  • M. Maniruzzaman
    • 2
  • Apurba Kanti Choudhury
    • 3
  • M. Abu Hena Sorwar Jahan
    • 3
  • Md. Main Uddin Miah
    • 1
  • Ranjit Sen
    • 3
  • M. Zia Uddin Kamal
    • 1
  • Md. Abdul Mannan
    • 1
  • Humayun Kabir Shiragi
    • 1
  • Wais Kabir
    • 4
  • Naveen Kalra
    • 4
  1. 1.Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural UniversityGazipurBangladesh
  2. 2.Bangladesh Rice Research InstituteGazipurBangladesh
  3. 3.Bangladesh Agricultural Research InstituteGazipurBangladesh
  4. 4.Krishi Gobeshona FoundationBARCFarmgate, DhakaBangladesh

Personalised recommendations