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Journal of General Plant Pathology

, Volume 85, Issue 1, pp 33–38 | Cite as

Molecular characterization of Ralstonia solanacearum strains causing bacterial wilt of solanaceous crops in Myanmar by rep-PCR analysis

  • Htet Wai Wai Kyaw
  • Kenichi Tsuchiya
  • Masaru Matsumoto
  • Seint San Aye
  • Kazuhiro IiyamaEmail author
  • Daisuke Kurose
  • Mitsuo Horita
  • Naruto Furuya
Bacterial and Phytoplasma Diseases
  • 79 Downloads

Abstract

Seventy strains of Ralstonia solanacearum from solanaceous crops in Myanmar were molecularly characterized by rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting. Cluster analysis based on the fingerprints (total 33 fingerprint types) revealed seven main clusters at 80% similarity level. Strains in phylotype I showed 29 fingerprint types and were divided into six clusters, most of which were closely correlated with host plant, geographic origin, sequevar and/or biovar. In contrast, phylotype II strains showed four DNA fingerprint types within a single cluster. These results suggest that genetic diversity of the strains is endemic and that phylotype I and II may be invasive strains.

Keywords

Ralstonia solanacearum Rep-PCR Myanmar Cluster 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are grateful to the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. We also thank Dr. Satoshi Kamitani, Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University for his support for data analysis. We deeply acknowledge Dr. Harry Evans, emeritus fellow for his English language editing. Part of this research was supported by the grants from the Project of the NARO Bio-Oriented Technology Research Advancement Institution (Research Program on Development of Innovative Technology No. 29014C).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval/human and animal rights statement

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

Supplementary material

10327_2018_818_MOESM1_ESM.pptx (1.5 mb)
Supplementary material 1 Supplemental Fig. 1 Agarose gel showing rep-PCR genomic fingerprint patterns of Myanmar strains of Ralstonia solanacearum. BOXA1R, ERIC/ERIC1R, and REP/REP1R primers were used. Strains are indicated above the lanes. PD441, phylotype II sequevar 1 potato strain, was used as a reference. First lane is DNA molecular size marker (Wide-Range DNA ladder, 50-10,000 bp, Takara Bio, Otsu, Shiga, Japan). Sizes indicated with black triangles are mentioned in the text. (PPTX 1492 KB)
10327_2018_818_MOESM2_ESM.pptx (5.4 mb)
Supplementary material 2 Supplemental Fig. 2 Genetic diversity of 70 Ralstonia solanacearum strains from solanaceous crops in Myanmar using BOX-PCR. Foreign strain PD441 was used as a reference strain and constructed using unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average clustering based on Dice’s similarity coefficient. Values on the branches represent the results of bootstrap analysis with 1,000 iterations. First lane is DNA molecular size marker (Wide-Range DNA ladder, 50-10,000 bp, Takara Bio, Otsu, Shiga, Japan). Sizes indicated with black triangles are mentioned in the text. (PPTX 5514 KB)
10327_2018_818_MOESM3_ESM.pptx (86 kb)
Supplementary material 3 Supplemental Fig. 3 Genetic diversity of Ralstonia solanacearum strains from solanaceous crops in Myanmar using ERIC-PCR. Foreign strain PD441 was used as reference strain and constructed using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average clustering based on Dice’s similarity coefficient. Values on the branches represent the results of bootstrap analysis with 1,000 iterations. First lane is DNA molecular size marker (Wide-Range DNA ladder, 50-10,000 bp, Takara Bio, Otsu, Shiga, Japan). Sizes indicated with black triangles are mentioned in the text. (PPTX 86 KB)
10327_2018_818_MOESM4_ESM.pptx (5.3 mb)
Supplementary material 4 Supplemental Fig. 4 Genetic diversity of Ralstonia solanacearum strains from solanaceous crops in Myanmar using REP-PCR. Foreign strain PD441 was used as a reference strain and constructed using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average clustering based on Dice’s similarity coefficient. Values on the branches represent the results of bootstrap analysis with 1,000 iterations. First lane is DNA molecular size marker (Wide-Range DNA ladder, 50-10,000 bp, Takara Bio, Otsu, Shiga, Japan). Sizes indicated with black triangles are mentioned in the text. (PPTX 5422 KB)
10327_2018_818_MOESM5_ESM.pptx (14.6 mb)
Supplementary material 5 Supplemental Fig. 5 Distribution of Myanmar strains of Ralstonia solanacearum belonging to seven clusters obtained by rep-PCR fingerprint analysis. Number in parentheses indicates strain number. (PPTX 14997 KB)

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Copyright information

© The Phytopathological Society of Japan and Springer Japan KK, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Htet Wai Wai Kyaw
    • 1
  • Kenichi Tsuchiya
    • 1
  • Masaru Matsumoto
    • 2
  • Seint San Aye
    • 3
  • Kazuhiro Iiyama
    • 1
    Email author
  • Daisuke Kurose
    • 4
  • Mitsuo Horita
    • 5
  • Naruto Furuya
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Plant Pathology, Faculty of AgricultureKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan
  2. 2.Land-Water Resources and Environment Conservation Section, Institute of Tropical AgricultureKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Plant PathologyYezin Agricultural UniversityNaypyidawMyanmar
  4. 4.CABI Europe-UKSurreyUK
  5. 5.Institute for Agro-Environmental SciencesNational Agricultural Research OrganizationTsukubaJapan

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