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Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery

, Volume 8, Issue 4, pp 244–249 | Cite as

Prednicarbate (Dermatop®): Profile of a Corticosteroid

  • Aditya K. GuptaEmail author
  • Melody Chow
Review

Abstract

Background

Topical steroids have been a popular choice for treating various cutaneous disorders; however, the potential for significant local and systemic adverse events, like skin atrophy and hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis suppression, has limited their use.

Objective

This article reviews the topical steroid prednicarbate through its mechanism of action, clinical efficacy, and adverse events profile.

Methods

Published literature containing the word “prednicarbate” was examined and summarized.

Results

Prednicarbate is a nonhalogenated, double-ester derivative of prednisolone that has been used in the treatment of inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses such as atopic dermatitis. It has a favorable benefit–risk ratio, low skin atrophy potential, and high anti-inflammatory action.

Conclusion

These characteristics make prednicarbate an ideal alternative agent for children, elderly patients, and those who require long-term intermittent treatment.

Keywords

Atopic Dermatitis Pimecrolimus Skin Atrophy Betamethasone Valerate Prednicarbate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Sommaire

Antécédents

Les stéroïdes topiques représentent un choix populaire dans le traitement de divers troubles cutanés. Toutefois, la possibilité d’événements indésirables locaux et systémiques, tels que 1’atrophie cutanée et la suppression de 1’axe hypothalamo-hypophyso-surrénalien, ont limité leur usage.

Objectif

Cette étude souligne le mécanisme d’action, 1’efficacité clinique et le profil des événements indésirables du prednicarbate, un stéroïde topique.

Méthode

Les articles spécialisés publiés contenant le terme ‹prednicarbate› ont été revus et résumés.

Résultats

Le prednicarbate est un dérivé du prednisone, non halogéné et double ester, utilisé dans le traitement des manifestations inflammatoires et pruritiques des dermatoses qui réagissent aux corticostéroïdes, telles que les dermatites atopiques. Le prednicarbate présente un rapport avantage-risque favorable, avec un faible potentiel d’atrophie cutanée et une action anti-inflammatoire puissante.

Conclusion

Grâce à ces caractéristiques, le prednicarbate est un agent alternatif idéal pour les enfants, les personnes âgées et les patients nécessitant un traitement intermittent de longue durée.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Dermatology, Department of MedicineSunnybrook and Women’s College Health Science Center (Sunnybrook site) and the University of TorontoTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Mediprobe Research Inc.LondonCanada

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