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Techniques in Coloproctology

, Volume 20, Issue 12, pp 865–869 | Cite as

Laparoscopic Deloyers procedure for tension-free anastomosis after extended left colectomy: technique and results

  • A. Sciuto
  • C. Grifasi
  • F. Pirozzi
  • P. Leon
  • R. E. M. Pirozzi
  • F. CorcioneEmail author
Technical Note

Abstract

Background

The Deloyers procedure, which includes inversion of the right colon around the axis of the ileocolic vessels, can be used to achieve a well vascularized, tension-free colorectal anastomosis after extended left colectomy. The aim of this study is to report our technique and outcome in a series of ten consecutive patients who underwent right colonic transposition by laparoscopic approach.

Methods

Charts were retrospectively reviewed to analyze postoperative outcome and bowel function. A video was recorded to demonstrate the procedure.

Results

Conversion was required in one (10%) patient due to extensive adhesions. No intraoperative complications were recorded. Anastomotic leakage occurred in one (10%) case and was managed with peritoneal lavage and ileostomy. Six months after surgery, all patients reported a median number of 2.5 (range 2–3) bowel movements per day with solid stool consistency. Neither anastomotic stricture nor bowel ischemia was found at 1-year endoscopic follow-up.

Conclusion

Our experience shows that laparoscopic right colonic transposition is a safe and feasible procedure and provides good functional outcomes.

Keywords

Deloyers procedure Right colon transposition Colorectal anastomosis Laparoscopic colorectal surgery Left colectomy 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in this study were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institution.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

Supplementary material

Supplementary material 1 (MP4 465889 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Sciuto
    • 1
  • C. Grifasi
    • 1
  • F. Pirozzi
    • 2
  • P. Leon
    • 1
  • R. E. M. Pirozzi
    • 3
  • F. Corcione
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of General, Laparoscopic and Robotic SurgeryAzienda Ospedaliera Specialistica dei Colli – Monaldi HospitalNaplesItaly
  2. 2.Department of Abdominal SurgeryCasa Sollievo della Sofferenza Research HospitalSan Giovanni RotondoItaly
  3. 3.School of Medicine and SurgeryUniversity of Naples Federico IINaplesItaly

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