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International Journal of Clinical Oncology

, Volume 24, Issue 11, pp 1490–1497 | Cite as

Clinical results of carbon-ion radiotherapy with separation surgery for primary spine/paraspinal sarcomas

  • Yoshihiro MatsumotoEmail author
  • Akira Matsunobu
  • Kenichi Kawaguchi
  • Mistumasa Hayashida
  • Keiichiro Iida
  • Hirokazu Saiwai
  • Seiji Okada
  • Makoto Endo
  • Nokitaka Setsu
  • Toshifumi Fujiwara
  • Shingo Baba
  • Satoshi Nomoto
  • Yasuharu Nakashima
Original Article
  • 67 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate the clinical outcome of combination of carbon-ion radiotherapy with separation surgery (CIRT-SS) in patients with primary spinal/paraspinal sarcoma (PSPS) and epidural spinal cord compression (ESCC).

Methods

CIRT-SS was performed in 11 consecutive patients. Patients treated in the primary and salvage settings were categorized into Group A (n = 8) and Group B (n  = 3), respectively. Clinical results and imaging findings were collected, with a particular focus on ESCC grade, treatment-associated adverse events (AEs), and the locoregional control (LRC) rate and overall survival (OS).

Results

The median follow-up period from the start of CIRT-SS was 25 months (7–57 months). ESCC was improved by SS in all cases. No patients exhibited radiation-induced myelopathy (RIM), but three developed Grade 3 vertebral compression fracture (VCF) during follow-up. Locoregional recurrences were observed in four patients [Group A: 1 (12.5%), Group B: 3 (100%)]. Over the entire follow-up period, three patients developed distant metastases and two patients died. The 2-year LRC rate and OS were 70% and 80%, respectively.

Conclusion

CIRT-SS in the primary setting achieved acceptable LRC and OS without RIM in patients with PSPS and with ESCC. VCF was the most frequent AE associated with CIRT-SS.

Keywords

Carbon-ion radiotherapy Separation surgery Primary spinal/paraspinal sarcoma Epidural spinal cord compression Vertebral compression fracture 

Notes

Funding

This work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (#18K09067).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Japan Society of Clinical Oncology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshihiro Matsumoto
    • 1
    Email author
  • Akira Matsunobu
    • 2
  • Kenichi Kawaguchi
    • 1
  • Mistumasa Hayashida
    • 1
  • Keiichiro Iida
    • 3
  • Hirokazu Saiwai
    • 1
  • Seiji Okada
    • 1
  • Makoto Endo
    • 1
  • Nokitaka Setsu
    • 1
  • Toshifumi Fujiwara
    • 1
  • Shingo Baba
    • 4
  • Satoshi Nomoto
    • 2
  • Yasuharu Nakashima
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical SciencesKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan
  2. 2.Ion Beam Therapy CenterSAGA HIMAT FoundationTosuJapan
  3. 3.Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Beppu HospitalKyushu UniversityBeppuJapan
  4. 4.Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical SciencesKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan

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