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Lasers in Medical Science

, Volume 34, Issue 7, pp 1473–1481 | Cite as

Irradiation by blue light-emitting diode enhances osteogenic differentiation in gingival mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

  • Tingting Zhu
  • Yan Wu
  • Xiangyu Zhou
  • Yaoyao Yang
  • Yao WangEmail author
Original Article
  • 127 Downloads

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of blue light irradiation on the process of osteogenic differentiation in stem cells. The cells used in this study were derived from human gingival mesenchymal stem cells (hGMSCs), and were treated with 0 (control group), 1, 2, 4 or 6 J/cm2 blue light using blue light-emitting diodes. Cell growth was assessed by the 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-Diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay and osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by monitoring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, alizarin red staining and real-time PCR (RT-PCR). The results of the MTT assay indicated that blue light inhibited hGMSC proliferation, and the ALP and alizarin red results showed that blue light promoted osteogenesis. The expression levels of the osteogenic genes runt-related transcription factor2 (Runx2), collagen type I (Col1) and osteocalcin (OCN) increased significantly (P < 0.05) when cells were irradiated with 2 or 4 J/cm2 of blue light. In conclusion, irradiation with blue light inhibits the proliferation of hGMSC and promotes osteogenic differentiation.

Keywords

Blue light-emitting diode Osteogenic differentiation Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) Gingiva 

Notes

Funding

This work was supported by the Luzhou Municipal People’s Government-Southwest Medical University science and technology strategic cooperation projects of China (no. 2017LZXNYD-T03), Luzhou Municipal Science and Technology Bureau of China (no. 2016-R-70(13/24)). The reagents of this study were supported by these funds that all came from Southwest Medical University.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in the study were in accordance with the Ethics Committee of the Affiliated Hospital of Stomatology Southwest Medical University Certificate (contract grant 20180314001) and with the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Supplementary material

10103_2019_2750_MOESM1_ESM.doc (2.8 mb)
ESM 1 (DOC 2871 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Yantai Stomatological HospitalYanTaiChina
  2. 2.Southwest Medical UniversityLu ZhouChina
  3. 3.Department of Vascular and Thyroid SurgeryThe Affiliated Hospital of Southwest Medical UniversityLu ZhouChina
  4. 4.Hospital of Stomatology Southwest Medical UniversityLu ZhouChina

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