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Computing strong lower and upper bounds for the integrated multiple-depot vehicle and crew scheduling problem with branch-and-price

  • Markó Horváth
  • Tamás KisEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

In the problem of the title, vehicle and crew schedules are to be determined simultaneously in order to satisfy a given set of trips over time. The vehicles and the crew are assigned to depots, and a number of rules have to be observed in the course of constructing feasible schedules. The main contribution of the paper is a novel mathematical programming formulation which combines ideas from known models, and an exact solution procedure based on branch-and-price. The method is tested on benchmark instances from the literature and it provides suboptimal schedules using limited computational resources.

Keywords

Vehicle and crew scheduling Branch-and-price Exact methods Integer programming 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work has been supported by the OTKA Grant K112881, and by the GINOP-2.3.2-15-2016-00002 Grant of the Ministry of National Economy of Hungary. The authors are grateful to the developers of the SCIP Optimization Suite for their support.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Computer Science and ControlHungarian Academy of SciencesBudapestHungary

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