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Environmentally friendly methodology for fouling removal in pipeline based on leaky guided wave generated by quasi-axisymmetric excitation mode

  • Shuqing Li
  • Ri Fang
  • Zhigang QuEmail author
  • Liqun Wu
  • Yang An
  • Ying Liu
  • Jie Yang
  • Shuo Jin
  • Wuliang Yin
Perspective
  • 51 Downloads

Abstract

In this paper, an environmental and innovative clean technique for pipeline fouling is proposed, which is based on leaky ultrasonic guided waves (LUGWs) generated by quasi-axisymmetric excitation mode. The cavitation, which induced by the LUGWs in liquid medium, is employed for removing fouling inside a pipe. Cavitation corrosion and high-speed jet generated by the collapse of cavitation bubbles destroy fouling layer, and no by-products are formed during the removal process, which means that fouling removal in this way is friendly to the environment. The working frequency is determined by finite element method models and experiment. The effect of removal and its uniformity are measured by mass analysis, scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectroscopy from macro to micro. The descaling experiment results show that the proposed method is able to remove the fouling inside a pipe uniformly.

Graphical abstract

Keywords

Fouling removal Leaky ultrasonic guided waves Quasi-axisymmetric Finite element method 

Abbreviations

LUGWs

Leaky ultrasonic guided waves

UGWs

Ultrasonic guided waves

SEM

Scanning electron microscope

EDS

Energy-dispersive spectroscopy

FEM

Finite element method

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51674176, 61873187) and Humanities, Social Sciences Foundation of the Ministry of Education (Youth Fund) Grant No. 18YJC630108 and Fundamental scientific research fund Project of Tianjin Universities (2017KDYB29).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shuqing Li
    • 1
    • 4
  • Ri Fang
    • 1
  • Zhigang Qu
    • 1
    • 4
    Email author
  • Liqun Wu
    • 1
  • Yang An
    • 1
    • 4
  • Ying Liu
    • 2
    • 4
  • Jie Yang
    • 1
  • Shuo Jin
    • 1
  • Wuliang Yin
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.College of Electronic Information and AutomationTianjin University of Science and TechnologyTianjinChina
  2. 2.College of Computer Science and Information EngineeringTianjin University of Science and TechnologyTianjinChina
  3. 3.School of Electrical and Electronic EngineeringUniversity of ManchesterManchesterUK
  4. 4.Advanced Structural Integrity International Joint Research CentreTianjin University of Science and TechnologyTianjinChina

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