Advertisement

Laboratory evaluation of the mechanical properties of roller compacted concrete pavement containing ceramic and coal waste powders

  • Mohsen Shamsaei
  • Ramin Khafajeh
  • Iman Aghayan
Original Paper

Abstract

In this study, the use of ceramic and coal waste powders as partial replacement of cement in roller compacted concrete pavement mixture was investigated. The mixtures were produced with the ceramic waste powder contents at 5% and 10% of total cementitious material (by weight). In addition, mixtures containing ceramic and coal waste powders were prepared simultaneously. Five different concrete mixes were prepared, and the unit weight, VeBe time, compressive, splitting tensile, and flexural strengths of mixture were measured for all the specimens. All tests were performed after 7, 28, and 90 days of curing. The results indicated that the use of the ceramic and coal waste powders as a partial replacement of cement decreased the unit weight and VeBe time. According to the results, the application of ceramic and coal waste powders reduced the splitting tensile, compressive and flexural strengths than control specimens. The lowest loss in strengths was found in specimens containing 5% ceramic waste powder, that after 28-day curing, it was observed that the average compressive, splitting tensile and flexural strengths decreased by 4%, 5%, and 2%, respectively. In addition, the 28-day compressive strength of the mixture containing 5% ceramic waste powder was higher than the minimum value proposed by the guide. Furthermore, the loss of strength in specimens containing only ceramic waste powder was lower than the specimens containing ceramic and coal waste powders. It could be concluded that using ceramic and coal waste powders in roller compacted concrete pavement not only is it effective in reducing the cost and preventing waste from entering the environment but also it can be considered as a step toward sustainability.

Graphical abstract

Keywords

Roller compacted concrete pavement Mechanical properties Ceramic waste Coal waste Recycling 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was funded by Shahrood University of Technology (No. 15027).

Supplementary material

10098_2018_1657_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (133 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 132 kb)

References

  1. ACI (1997) Guide for selecting proportions for no-slump concrete. ACI 211.3R. American Concrete Institute, Farmington HillsGoogle Scholar
  2. ACI (2011) Roller compacted concrete pavement. ACI 325.10R. American Concrete Institute, Farmington HillsGoogle Scholar
  3. Aprianti E, Bahri S, Shafigh P, Farahani JN (2015) Supplementary cementitious materials origin from agricultural wastes—a review. Constr Build Mater 74:176–187CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. ASTM (1996) Standard test method for splitting tensile strength of cylindrical concrete specimens. ASTM C496-96. ASTM International, West ConshohockenGoogle Scholar
  5. ASTM (2007a) Standard specification for portlant cement. ASTM C150-07. ASTM International, West ConshohockenGoogle Scholar
  6. ASTM (2007b) Standard test method for flexural strength of concrete (using simple beam with third-point loading). ASTM C78-07. ASTM International, West ConshohockenGoogle Scholar
  7. ASTM (2008) Standard test method for determining consistency and density of roller-compacted concrete using a vibrating table. ASTM C1170/C1170M-08. ASTM International, West ConshohockenGoogle Scholar
  8. ASTM (2011) Standard test method for compressive strength of cylindrical concrete specimens. ASTM C39/C39M-11a. ASTM International, West ConshohockenGoogle Scholar
  9. ASTM (2015) Standard test method for coal fly ash and raw calcined natural pozzolan for use in concrete. ASTM C618. ASTM International, West ConshohockenGoogle Scholar
  10. Cheng YH, Huang F, Liu R, Hou J, Li G (2016) Test research on effects of waste ceramic polishing powder on the permeability resistance of concrete. Mater Struct 49(3):729–738CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Eva V, Dana K, Tereza K, Adam H, Robert C (2014) Mechanical and thermal properties of moderate-strength concrete with ceramic powder used as supplementary cementitious material. Adv Mater Res 1054:194–198CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Ghahari SA, Mohammadi A, Ramezanianpour AA (2017) Performance assessment of natural pozzolan roller compacted concrete pavement. Case Stud Constr Mater 7:82–90CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Heidari A, Tavakoli D (2013) A study of the mechanical properties of ground ceramic powder concrete incorporating nano-SiO2 particles. Constr Build Mater 38:255–264CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Heidari A, Pour-Tabari MR, Kamalvand M, Safari M (2015) The effect of waste ceramic and microsilica in powdered concrete. In: 1th international conference on human, architecture and civil engineering. Tabrize, IranGoogle Scholar
  15. Hesami S, Modarres A, Soltaninejad M, Madani H (2016) Mechanical properties of roller compact concrete pavement containing coal waste and limestone powder as partial replacements of cement. Constr Build Mater 111:625–636CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Jaroslav P, Jan F, Milena P, Jiri S, Zbysek P (2014) Application of mixed ceramic powder in cement based composites. Adv Mater Res 1054:177–181CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Junakova N, Junak J, Balintova M (2015) Reservoir sediment as a secondary raw material in concrete production. Clean Technol Environ 17(5):1161–1169CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Kannan DM, Aboubakr SH, EL-Dieb AS, Reda Taha MM (2017) High performance concrete incorporating ceramic waste powder as large partial replacement of Portland cement. Constr Build Mater 144:35–41CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Kim J, Yi C, Zi G (2015) Waste glass sludge as a partial cement replacement in mortar. Constr Build Mater 75:242–246CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Krishna Rao S, Sravana P, Chandrasekhar Rao T (2016) Abrasion resistance and mechanical properties of Roller Compacted Concrete with GGBS. Constr Build Mater 114:925–933CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Ma M, Cai W (2018) What drives the carbon mitigation in Chinese commercial building sector? Evidence from decomposing an extended Kaya identity. Sci Total Environ 634:884–899CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Ma M, Yan R, Du Y, Ma X, Cai W, Xu P (2017) A methodology to assess China’s building energy savings at the national level: an IPAT–LMDI model approach. J Clean Prod 143:784–793CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Ma M, Yan R, Cai W (2018) Energy savings evaluation in public building sector during the 10th–12th FYP periods of China: an extended LMDI model approach. Nat Hazards 92(1):429–441CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Modarres A, Hosseini Z (2014) Mechanical properties of roller compacted concrete containing rice husk ash with original and recycled asphalt pavement material. Mater Des 64:227–236CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Modarres A, Hesami S, Soltaninejad M, Madani H (2016) Application of coal waste in sustainable roller compacted concrete pavement-environmental and technical assessment. Int J Pavement Eng.  https://doi.org/10.1080/10298436.2016.1205747 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Pacheco-Torgal F, Jalali S (2011) Compressive strength and durability properties of ceramic wastes based concrete. Mater Struct 44(1):155–167CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Vahedifard F, Nili M, Meehan CL (2010) Assessing the effects of supplementary cementitious materials on the performance of low-cement roller compacted concrete pavement. Constr Build Mater 24(12):2528–2535CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringShahrood University of TechnologyShahroodIran

Personalised recommendations