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Does prolonged blood culture incubation improve microbiological diagnosis of HACEK and slow-growing bacteria infective endocarditis?

  • Julie Lourtet-HascoëtEmail author
  • B. Pilmis
  • A. Mizrahi
  • J. C Nguyen Van
  • A. Le Monnier
Letter to the Editor
  • 40 Downloads

We were very interested with the publication by Lindell et al. and the letter by Fida et al. describing cases of infective endocarditis due to Cutibacterium acnes especially on prosthetic valves [1, 2].

C. acnes are large described anaerobic bacteria part of cutaneous flora and involved in deep infections. Many studies report cases of bone and joint infections, meningitis, infective endocarditis (IE), or endovascular infections [3, 4]. It is well known that prolonged cultures are necessary to detect C. acnes, because they are slow-growing bacteria detected after several days especially on cultures under anaerobic atmosphere.

IE is a disease characterized by a high rate of morbidity and mortality. The in-hospital mortality rate is up to 20%, with a one-year mortality ranging between 25 and 40%. According to French and European guidelines, prolonged cultures of blood cultures are recommended in case of suspicion of IE.

In Saint Joseph Hospital, Paris, France, the cardiologic unit handles...

Notes

References

  1. 1.
    Fida M, Dylla BL, Sohail MR, Pritt BS, Schuetz AN, Patel R (2019) Role of prolonged blood culture incubation in infective endocarditis diagnosis. European journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology 38(1):197–198CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Lindell F, Soderquist B, Sundman K, Olaison L, Kallman J (2018) Prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Propionibacterium species: a national registry-based study of 51 Swedish cases. European journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology 37(4):765–771CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Banzon JM, Rehm SJ, Gordon SM, Hussain ST, Pettersson GB, Shrestha NK (2017) Propionibacterium acnes endocarditis: a case series. Clinical microbiology and infection : the official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases 23(6):396–399CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Walter G, Vernier M, Pinelli PO, Million M, Coulange M, Seng P et al (2014) Bone and joint infections due to anaerobic bacteria: an analysis of 61 cases and review of the literature. European journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology. 33(8):1355–1364CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Microbiology FSo.REMIC: medical microbiology standards. In: SFM S, SFP, editor. medical microbiology standards. 12018Google Scholar
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    Baron EJ, Scott JD, Tompkins LS (2005) Prolonged incubation and extensive subculturing do not increase recovery of clinically significant microorganisms from standard automated blood cultures. Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 41(11):1677–1680CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Forward KR (2006) An evaluation of extended incubation time with blind subculture of blood cultures in patients with suspected endocarditis. The Canadian journal of infectious diseases & medical microbiology = Journal canadien des maladies infectieuses et de la microbiologie medicale 17(3):186–188CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie Lourtet-Hascoët
    • 1
    Email author
  • B. Pilmis
    • 2
  • A. Mizrahi
    • 1
  • J. C Nguyen Van
    • 1
  • A. Le Monnier
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinical Microbiological LaboratorySaint Joseph HospitalParisFrance
  2. 2.Antimicrobial stewardship teamSaint-Joseph HospitalParisFrance

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