Advertisement

Journal of Wood Science

, Volume 64, Issue 5, pp 551–556 | Cite as

Studies on pre-treatment by compression for wood impregnation I: effects of compression ratio, compression direction, compression speed and compression-unloading place on the liquid impregnation of wood

  • Youke Zhao
  • Zhihui Wang
  • Ikuho Iida
  • Juan GuoEmail author
Original Article
  • 122 Downloads

Abstract

To improve the impregnation of wood, the pre-treatment by compression was systematically studied in terms of effects of compression ratio, compression direction, compression speed and compression-unloading place on the liquid impregnation in poplar and Chinese fir. The results showed: the impregnation increased 0.0065 or 0.0074 g/cm3 for every 1% increase of compression ratio when the compression ratio was lower or equal to 50 and 40% for poplar and Chinese fir, respectively; it continued to increase afterwards while the variation was quite big. There existed a significant difference of the impregnation of wood compressed at different directions in Chinese fir, but not in poplar. There existed a significant difference of the impregnation of wood compressed at different speed in both species. The impregnation of wood is likely to be in favor of radial compression in terms of the amount of impregnation. 5 and 10 mm/min were recommended as a compromise of impregnation and pre-treatment efficiency. The impregnation of wood that the compression unloaded in water was about 18.2 (poplar) and 9.2% (Chinese fir) higher in amount and was much quicker in speed than that the compression unloaded in air, and the difference between them was significant, suggesting that compression unloaded in water is significant to improve the impregnation.

Keywords

Pre-treatment Compression Wood impregnation Penetration 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Fundamental Research Funds of Research Institute of Forest New Technology, CAF (Grant no. CAFYBB2017SY037).

References

  1. 1.
    Cech MY, Huffman DR (1970) Dynamic transverse compression treatment of Spruce to improve intake of preservatives. For Prod J 20:47–52Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Cech MY (1971) Dynamic transverse compression treatment to improve drying behavior of Yellow Birch. For Prod J 21:41–50Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Iida I, Norimoto M, Imamura Y (1984) Hygrothermal recovery of compression set (in Japanese). Mokuzai Gakkaishi 30:354–358Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Watanabe U, Imamura Y, Iida I (1998) Liquid penetration of precompressed wood VI: anatomical characterization of pit fractures. J Wood Sci 44:158–162CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Iida I, Takayama C, Miyagawa O, Imamura Y (1992) Liquid penetration of precompressed wood I: effects of compressive deformation and recovery upon liquid uptake (in Japanese). Mokuzai Gakkaishi 38:233–240Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Iida I, Imamura Y, Kashiwa N, Nakamura Y (1992) Liquid penetration of precompressed wood II: effects of thickness and length of specimen on liquid uptake (in Japanese). Mokuzai Hozon (Wood Preserv) 18:31–37CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Iida I, Ikeuchi A, Imamura Y (1995) Liquid penetration of precompressed woods 3: effects of moisture contents of specimens and ambient temperatures while compression on liquid uptakes of softwoods and hardwoods (in Japanese). Mokuzai Gakkashi 41:811–819Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Iida I, Mori S, Nakamura Y, Sakai H, Imamura Y (1996) Liquid penetration of precompressed wood V: effects of cyclic loading, type of impregnated chemicals and annual ring angles on the uptake of water or oily solvents (in Japanese). Mokuzai Gakkaishi 42:581–588Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Iida I, Yusuf S, Watanabe U, Imamura Y (2002) Liquid penetration of precompressed wood VII: the combined treatment of precompression and extraction in hot water on the liquid penetration of wood. J Wood Sci 48:81–85CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Iida I, Imamura Y (1995) Liquid penetration of precompressed wood 4: mechanical properties of set-fixed wood before and after recovery (in Japanese). Mokuzai Gakkaishi 41:1165–1172Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Zhao Y, Wang Z, Iida I, Huang R, Lu J, Jiang J (2016) Studies on pre-treatment by compression for wood drying II: studies on pre-treatment by compression for wood drying II: effects of compression ratio, compression direction and compression speed on the recovery rate and mechanical properties of wood. J Wood Sci 62:226–232CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Zhao Y (2017) Studies on pre-treatment by compression for wood drying III: the reduction of moisture content, the recovery rate, and mechanical properties of wood compressed at different moisture content conditions. J Wood Sci 63:209–215CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Abe H, Funada R, Kuroda N, Furusawa O, Shibagaki M, Fujii T (2001) Confocal laser scanning microscopy of water uptake during the recovery of compressed and drying-set wood. Iawa J 22(1):63–72CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Adachi K, Inoue M, Kawai S (2005) Liquid impregnation of green wood using a roller-pressing method (in Japanese). Mokuzai Gakkaishi 51:159–165CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Günzerodt H, Walker JCF, Whybrew K (1988) Compression rolling of sitka spruce and Douglas fir. For Prod J 38:16–18Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Zhao Y, Wang Z, Iida I, Huang R, Lu J, Jiang J (2015) Studies on pre-treatment by compression for wood drying I: effects of compression ratio, compression direction and compression speed on the reduction of moisture content in wood. J Wood Sci 61:113–119CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Siau JF (1995) Wood: influence of moisture on physical properties. Department of Wood Science and Forest Products, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, BlacksburgGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Jiang X, Yin Y (2008) Quantative anatomy of Chinese fir and poplar. In: Jiang Z, Jiang X (eds) Wood structures and their relations with the wood properties (in Chinese). Science Press, Beijing, pp 81–82Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Japan Wood Research Society 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research Institute of Forestry New TechnologyChinese Academy of ForestryBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Research Institute of Wood IndustryChinese Academy of ForestryBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Laboratory of Wood Technology, Kyoto Prefectural UniversityKyotoJapan

Personalised recommendations