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Acute ischemic stroke due to endocarditis from Brucella infection

  • Amelia Brigandi’Email author
  • Carmen Terranova
  • Antonio Toscano
  • Giuseppe Vita
Letter to the Editor
  • 31 Downloads

Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease which could be transmitted from animals to humans, mainly in Mediterranean basin countries [1], often after the ingestion of meals containing not perfectly sterilized dairy products. High fever, myalgia, and arthralgia of the large joints are the principal symptoms [2]. Neurological complications are quite serious and occur in about 10% of cases. The most common presentations are acute or chronic meningoencephalitis, peripheral or cranial neuropathies, or cerebellar dysfunction. Endocarditis is seen in < 2% of cases. Aortic valve is often affected [3]. Stroke occurs in about 35% of cases of infective endocarditis [4], mostly based on septic brain embolization.

A 79-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic because of a mild left-sided hemiparesis. She did not report hearing loss, headache, meningeal signs, or altered states of consciousness. Before admission, she complained of intermittent fever for 2 weeks, tiredness, and arthralgia. She, then,...

Notes

Author contributions

Amelia Brigandi’: study concept and design, acquisition of data, analysis and interpretation, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content. Antonio Toscano: acquisition of data, analysis and interpretation, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content, case supervision. Carmen Terranova: study concept and design, acquisition of data, analysis and interpretation, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content. Giuseppe Vita: acquisition of data, analysis and interpretation.

Compliance with ethical standards

This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare they have no conflict of interest.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Fondazione Società Italiana di Neurologia 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Clinical and Experimental MedicineUniversity of MessinaMessinaItaly

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