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Neurological Sciences

, Volume 40, Issue 10, pp 2185–2187 | Cite as

Delayed cerebral microbleeds in a patient with cerebral fat embolism

  • Yaoyao ShenEmail author
  • Yanqin Guan
  • Jingyan Chai
  • Tingmin Dai
  • Yijun Suo
Letter to the Editor
  • 39 Downloads

Dear Editor,

Fat embolism syndrome, frequently associated with displaced long bone fracture of the lower extremities, is characterized by respiratory disability, petechial skin rash, and neurological symptoms. It is estimated that the incidence of cerebral fat embolism (CFE) is 0.9–2.2% [1]. The clinical presentations of CFE can vary greatly, ranging from mild confusion to coma, and rarely include seizures and focal findings. Five distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns of CFE, including scattered cytotoxic edema, confluent cytotoxic edema, vasogenic edema, petechial hemorrhage, and chronic sequelae, have been summarized by Kuo et al. after systematic review of the literature [2]. Previous case reports have suggested that it is common to detect diffuse microbleeds on susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). However, the exact time and mechanism of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are not well understood. Here, we describe a CFE patient presented with delayed CMBs after...

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Fondazione Società Italiana di Neurologia 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of NeurologyThe Affiliated Hospital of Jiujiang UniversityJiujiangPeople’s Republic of China

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