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The pathological spectrum behind migraine aura status: a case series

  • Alberto Terrin
  • Federico Mainardi
  • Ferdinando Maggioni
Brief Communication
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Abstract

Background

The recently released International Classification of Headache Disorders—3rd edition (1) includes migraine aura status (MAS) among the complications of migraine (A1.4.5). It is defined as the recurrence of at least three auras over a period of 3 days, in a patient suffering from migraine fulfilling criteria for 1.2 Migraine with aura (MA) or one of its subtypes.

Case series

We describe three cases of MAS secondary to an organic brain lesion: a migrainous infarction, an acute ischemic stroke secondary to a vertebral artery dissection, and an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system.

Conclusions

In front of a patient with a MAS, an organic lesion of the brain must be suspected, until a complete negative vascular and neuroradiological diagnostic workup has been performed. A spectrum of underlying pathologies (vascular or demyelinating diseases, epileptic or degenerative conditions) may cause a MAS-like clinical onset. The variability of aura symptoms may result in a real diagnostic challenge.

Keywords

Migrainous infarction Ischemic stroke Inflammatory diseases Recurrent auras Spectrum 

Abbreviations

MAS

Migraine aura status

MA

Migraine with aura

CT

Computed tomography

MRI

Magnetic resonance imaging

MRA

Magnetic resonance angiography

CTA

Computed tomography angiography

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Fondazione Società Italiana di Neurologia 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of NeuroscienceUniversity of PadovaPadovaItaly
  2. 2.Headache CentreHospital SS, Giovanni and PaoloVeniceItaly

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