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Neurological Sciences

, Volume 40, Issue 2, pp 333–338 | Cite as

Observing movement disorders: best practice proposal in the use of video recording in clinical practice

  • Luisa Sambati
  • Luca Baldelli
  • Giovanna Calandra Buonaura
  • Sabina Capellari
  • Giulia Giannini
  • Cesa Lorella Maria Scaglione
  • Massimo Armaroli
  • Elena Zoni
  • Pietro Cortelli
  • Paolo MartinelliEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Clinical evaluation is of utmost importance in the semeiological description of motor disorders which often require video recording to highlight subtle signs and their subsequent evolution. After reviewing 1858 video recordings, we composed a suitable list of video-documentation maneuvers, classified semeiologically in the form of a “video recording protocol”, to guarantee appropriate documentation when filming movement disorders. Aware that our proposed filming protocol is far from being exhaustive, by suggesting a more detailed documenting approach, it could help not only to achieve a better definition of some disorders, but also to guide neurologists towards the correct subsequent examinations. Moreover, it could be an important tool for the longitudinal evaluation of patients and their response to therapy. Finally, video recording is a powerful teaching tool as visual teaching highly improves educational training.

Keywords

Video recording Movement disorders Protocol Semeiological 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

10072_2018_3639_MOESM1_ESM.doc (40 kb)
ESM 1 (DOC 40 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia S.r.l., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luisa Sambati
    • 1
    • 2
  • Luca Baldelli
    • 2
  • Giovanna Calandra Buonaura
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sabina Capellari
    • 1
    • 2
  • Giulia Giannini
    • 1
    • 2
  • Cesa Lorella Maria Scaglione
    • 2
  • Massimo Armaroli
    • 1
  • Elena Zoni
    • 1
  • Pietro Cortelli
    • 1
    • 2
  • Paolo Martinelli
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, Unit of Neurology, Bellaria HospitalUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly
  2. 2.IRCCS Istituto delle Scienze Neurologiche di BolognaBolognaItaly

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