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Response to “Comment on ‘Impact of TNF-α inhibitor on lipid profile and atherogenic index of plasma in axial spondyloarthritis: Two-year follow-up data from the Catholic Axial Spondyloarthritis COhort (CASCO)’”

  • Hong Ki Min
  • Jennifer Lee
  • Ji Hyeon Ju
  • Sung-Hwan Park
  • Seung-Ki KwokEmail author
Letter to the Editor
  • 7 Downloads

We read with great interest the very important comment from Cure E et al. [1] on our recent study showing the impact of TNF-α inhibitor on lipid profile/atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) [2]. First of all, we appreciate the precious comments of Cure E et al. In general, comparing continuous variables, we should consider the normality. However, a recent review for statistics from Lydersen S recommends using Student’s t test rather than non-parametric tests such as the Mann–Whitney U test, because this could present more precise information even in a small sample size [3]. Furthermore, we performed the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test to show the normality of the data and total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were normally distributed. In addition, the P values from non-parametric test showed similar results to our former research [2]. Second, as commented by Cure E et...

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Disclosures

None.

References

  1. 1.
    Erkan Cure, Medine Cumhur Cure (2019) Comment on “Impact of TNF-alpha inhibitor on lipid profile and atherogenic index of plasma in axial spondyloarthritis: 2-year follow-up data from the Catholic Axial Spondyloarthritis COhort (CASCO)”. Clin RheumatolGoogle Scholar
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    Min HK, Lee J, Ju JH, Park SH, Kwok SK (2019) Impact of TNF-alpha inhibitor on lipid profile and atherogenic index of plasma in axial spondyloarthritis: 2-year follow-up data from the Catholic Axial Spondyloarthritis COhort (CASCO). Clin Rheumatol:1–7.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10067-019-04767-z
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    Lydersen S (2015) Statistical review: frequently given comments. Ann Rheum Dis 74:323–325.  https://doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-206186 CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hong Ki Min
    • 1
  • Jennifer Lee
    • 2
  • Ji Hyeon Ju
    • 2
  • Sung-Hwan Park
    • 2
  • Seung-Ki Kwok
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University Medical CenterKonkuk University School of MedicineSeoulRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of MedicineThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea

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