Advertisement

Patients with early-stage knee osteoarthritis and knee pain have decreased hip abductor muscle strength while descending stairs

  • Yusuke Suzuki
  • Hirotaka Iijima
  • Kanako Shimoura
  • Tadao Tsuboyama
  • Tomoki AoyamaEmail author
Original Article
  • 52 Downloads

Abstract

Introduction/objectives

This study aimed to investigate the association between hip abductor muscle strength and knee pain in patients with early-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA) while ascending and descending stairs.

Method

This cross-sectional study included individuals with early-stage knee OA (Kellgren/Lawrence grades 1 or 2). Knee pain while ascending and descending stairs was evaluated using a knee OA-related health domain measure (Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure). Knee extension and hip abductor muscle strength were also evaluated. The association between hip abductor muscle strength and knee pain while ascending and descending stairs was evaluated using multiple regression analysis.

Results

A total of 157 participants were included in the final analysis. After the adjustment for age, sex, and knee extension strength, those with knee pain while descending stairs showed significantly decreased hip abductor muscle strength (β, − 0.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], − 0.19 to − 0.003). In contrast, after the adjustment for age, sex, and knee extension muscle strength, those with knee pain while ascending stairs did not have significantly decreased hip abductor muscle strength (β, − 0.06; 95% CI, − 0.15 to 0.02).

Conclusions

Patients with early-stage knee OA and knee pain while descending stairs had significantly reduced hip abductor muscle strength.

Keywords

Early stage Hip abductor muscle Knee osteoarthritis Pain Stair descent 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank the Human Health Sciences students at Kyoto University for their help with the data collection. We also thank Editage (www.editage.jp) for the English language editing.

Funding

This study was supported by Omron Healthcare Co., Ltd.

Compliance with ethical standards

The ethics committee of Kyoto University approved the study (no. C1297), and written informed consent was obtained from all participants before enrollment.

Disclosures

None.

References

  1. 1.
    Hinman RS, Hunt MA, Creaby MW, Wrigley TV, McManus FJ, Bennell KL (2010) Hip muscle weakness in individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 62:1190–1193CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bennell KL, Hunt MA, Wrigley TV, Hunter DJ, McManus FJ, Hodges PW, Li L, Hinman RS (2010) Hip strengthening reduces symptoms but not knee load in people with medial knee osteoarthritis and varus malalignment: a randomised controlled trial. Osteoarthr Cartil 18:621–628CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Foroughi N, Smith RM, Lange AK, Baker MK, Fiatarone Singh MA, Vanwanseele B (2011) Lower limb muscle strengthening does not change frontal plane moments in women with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon) 26:167–174CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Mündermann A, Dyrby CO, Andriacchi TP (2005) Secondary gait changes in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis: increased load at the ankle, knee, and hip during walking. Arthritis Rheum 52:2835–2844CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Tevald MA, Murray A, Luc BA, Lai K, Sohn D, Pietrosimone B (2016) Hip abductor strength in people with knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study of reliability and association with function. Knee 23:57–62CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Hensor EM, Dube B, Kingsbury SR, Tennant A, Conaghan PG (2015) Toward a clinical definition of early osteoarthritis: onset of patient-reported knee pain begins on stairs. Data from the osteoarthritis initiative. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 67:40–47CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Fukutani N, Iijima H, Aoyama T, Yamamoto Y, Hiraoka M, Miyanobu K, Jinnouchi M, Kaneda E, Tsuboyama T, Matsuda S (2016) Knee pain during activities of daily living and its relationship with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis. Clin Rheumatol 35:2307–2316CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Amin S, Luepongsak N, McGibbon CA, LaValley MP, Krebs DE, Felson DT (2004) Knee adduction moment and development of chronic knee pain in elders. Arthritis Rheum 51:371–376CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Kellgren JH, Lawrence JS (1957) Radiological assessment of osteo-arthrosis. Ann Rheum Dis 16:494–502CrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Iijima H, Aoyama T, Fukutani N, Isho T, Yamamoto Y, Hiraoka M, Miyanobu K, Jinnouchi M, Kaneda E, Kuroki H, Matsuda S (2018) Psychological health is associated with knee pain and physical function in patients with knee osteoarthritis: an exploratory cross-sectional study. BMC Psychol 6:19CrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Akai M, Doi T, Fujino K, Iwaya T, Kurosawa H, Nasu T (2005) An outcome measure for Japanese people with knee osteoarthritis. J Rheumatol 32:1524–1532Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Wang CY, Olson SL, Protas EJ (2002) Test-retest strength reliability: hand-held dynamometry in community-dwelling elderly fallers. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 83:811–815CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Suzuki Y, Iijima H, Tashiro Y et al (2018) Development of a questionnaire survey to evaluate lower limb function of patients with knee osteoarthritis. Clin Rheumatol Aug 8(37):3115–3123CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Faul F, Erdfelder E, Lang AG, Buchner A (2007) G*power 3: a flexible statistical power analysis program for the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences. Behav Res Methods 39:175–191CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Cohen J (1988) Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences, 2nd edn. Lawrence Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Vickers AJ (2006) How to randomize. J Soc Integr Oncol 4:194–198CrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Guo M, Axe MJ, Manal K (2007) The influence of foot progression angle on the knee adduction moment during walking and stair climbing in pain free individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Gait Posture 26:436–441CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Andriacchi TP (2013) Valgus alignment and lateral compartment knee osteoarthritis: a biomechanical paradox or new insight into knee osteoarthritis? Arthritis Rheum 65:310–313CrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Kito N, Shinkoda K, Yamasaki T, Kanemura N, Anan M, Okanishi N, Ozawa J, Moriyama H (2010) Contribution of knee adduction moment impulse to pain and disability in Japanese women with medial knee osteoarthritis. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon) 25:914–919CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Salsich GB, Brechter JH, Powers CM (2001) Lower extremity kinetics during stair ambulation in patients with and without patellofemoral pain. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon) 16:906–912CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Kierkegaard S, Jørgensen PB, Dalgas U, Søballe K, Mechlenburg I (2015) Pelvic movement strategies and leg extension power in patients with end-stage medial compartment knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study. Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 135:1217–1226CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Mündermann A, Dyrby CO, Andriacchi TP (2005) Secondary gait changes in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis: increased load at the ankle, knee, and hip during walking. Arthritis Rheum 52:2835–2844CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yusuke Suzuki
    • 1
  • Hirotaka Iijima
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kanako Shimoura
    • 1
  • Tadao Tsuboyama
    • 1
  • Tomoki Aoyama
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Physical Therapy, Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of MedicineKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Department of System Design EngineeringKeio UniversityYokohamaJapan

Personalised recommendations