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Levels of growth factors from platelet-rich fibrin from chronic periodontitis versus periodontally healthy subjects: a pilot study

  • Jennifer Chang
  • Steven B. Blanchard
  • L. Jack Windsor
  • Richard L. Gregory
  • Yusuke HamadaEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Objectives

This study aimed to (1) compare the amounts of growth factors from platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) between chronic periodontitis and periodontally healthy subjects and (2) evaluate the relationships between the amounts of growth factors from PRF with complete blood counts (white blood cell (WBC) and platelet counts) and the serum concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α).

Materials and methods

Venous blood was collected from chronic periodontitis (test) and periodontally healthy subjects (control). PRF and serum were collected from the centrifuged blood. Liquid exudates from the compression of PRF were collected. The compressed PRF membranes were incubated in saline, and eluted aliquots were collected at 1, 24, and 72 h, and the membranes were then digested with trypsin. Epidermal growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, transforming growth factor-β1, and vascular endothelial growth factor in the exudates and eluents were quantified by ELISA. Serum was used for IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α quantifications. Complete blood counts were measured.

Results

There were no significant differences in the amounts of growth factors from PRF exudates and membranes measured between groups (all p > 0.05). The test group had significantly higher WBC (p < 0.05). However, there was no significant correlation between the WBC and the amounts of the growth factors from PRF (all p > 0.05).

Conclusions

PRF can be utilized as an autologous source of growth factors not affected by periodontal condition and WBC level.

Clinical relevance

The amounts of growth factors from PRF were not affected by the periodontal condition of the patient.

Keywords

Platelet-rich fibrin Platelet concentrates Chronic periodontitis Growth factors 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank Mr. George Eckert for the statistical analyses.

Funding

The work was supported by a Young Researcher Grant provided by the Osteology Foundation, Switzerland (project number: 16-142) and the Indiana University School of Dentistry Graduate Student Research Committee.

Compliance with ethical standards

All subjects were recruited from the Graduate Periodontics Clinic and the Comprehensive Care Clinics of Indiana University School of Dentistry with approval from the Indiana University Institutional Review Board (protocol# 1704165172) between September and November 2017.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional research committee.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer Chang
    • 1
  • Steven B. Blanchard
    • 2
  • L. Jack Windsor
    • 3
  • Richard L. Gregory
    • 3
  • Yusuke Hamada
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Periodontics and Dental HygieneUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of DentistryHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Periodontics and Allied Dental ProgramsIndiana University School of DentistryIndianaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Biomedical and Applied ScienceIndiana University School of DentistryIndianapolisUSA

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