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Publicly verifiable secure communication with user and data privacy

  • Zhongyuan YaoEmail author
  • Yi Mu
Original Article

Abstract

Security surveillance system plays an important role in the society. However, how to securely send the sensitive information from the surveillance node to the server is a critical issue which should be well addressed. In this paper, to develop a secure communication scheme applied between the surveillance camera and the server, we propose the important and desirable security and privacy features that should be achieved by such systems, and present a secure scheme that can achieve the security goals. Our scheme ensures that encrypted datagrams not sent from the surveillance cameras can be filtrated by a public message filter while data and sender privacy is still well preserved for encrypted data sent from legitimated cameras. Furthermore, the server in our scheme is the only entity which can reveal the real sender given a ciphertext produced by it and give a proof to convince others the origination of that ciphertext without leaking its content. Such property enables the server to build a searchable database using the camera’s identifier as index and also the message auditor to check the ciphertext and its origination stored in the database without any dispute. We provide the formal security models to define these security requirements and give formal security proofs in the random oracle model.

Keywords

Surveillance system Secure communication Message public verifiability User privacy Data privacy 

Notes

Funding information

This work is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (61822202, 61872087, 61872089)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Cybersecurity and Cryptology, School of Computing and Information TechnologyUniversity of WollongongWollongongAustralia
  2. 2.School of Mathematics and Computer ScienceFujian Normal UniversityFuzhouChina

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