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Zoledronic acid and skeletal-related events in patients with bone metastatic cancer or multiple myeloma

  • Ha-Lim Jeon
  • In-Sun Oh
  • Yeon-Hee Baek
  • Hyowon Yang
  • Jeehye Park
  • Soojung Hong
  • Ju-Young ShinEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Introduction

Investigations of ZA effectiveness using large, real-world databases are rare. We examined whether zoledronic acid (ZA) decreased the risk of skeletal-related events (SREs) among patients with bone metastases (BMs) from breast cancer (BC) or prostate cancer (PC), or multiple myeloma (MM) in routine clinical practice.

Materials and methods

We conducted a propensity score-matched cohort study using the Korean National Health Insurance database. Our cohort included patients diagnosed with BM after BC or PC, or MM between 2004 and 2015. SRE was defined as having a record of pathologic fracture, spinal cord compression, radiation, or surgery to bone. The incidence of multiple SREs was calculated according to SRE history. We calculated the incidence rate ratio (IRR) to examine the relative difference in the risk of SREs of ZA users compared to those of ZA non-user.

Results

Among 111,679 patients, diagnosed with BM and one of the three cancer types, 5608 were included in the analysis after propensity score matching. A decreased risk of SREs was observed for the ZA use in patients with history of SRE in BC [IRR = 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.66–0.83], PC (IRR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.73–1.02), and MM (IRR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.59–0.93). For patients without SRE history, ZA use was not associated with decreased risks of SREs, but rather increased the risks (BC: IRR = 1.96, 95% CI 1.87–2.05; PC: IRR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.54–1.80; MM: IRR = 1.92, 95% CI 1.57–2.34).

Conclusions

Our study suggests that the ZA use was associated with a decreased risk of SRE for patients with SRE history. However, no preventive effects of ZA were observed for patients without history.

Keywords

Zoledronic acid Skeletal-related events Bone metastasis Cancer Multiple myeloma 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by Amgen Inc. We would like to thank Editage (www.editage.co.kr) for English language editing.

Author contribution

HLJ: data analysis, interpretation of data, writing (original draft), and writing (review and editing). ISO: conceptualization, data analysis, and writing (original draft). YHB: conceptualization, and data analysis. HY: interpretation of data and project administration. JHP: interpretation of data and project administration. SH: interpretation of data. JYS: conceptualization, funding acquisition, and writing (review and editing).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Dr. Shin received grant support to her institution from Amgen. Hyowon Yang and Jeehye Park are employees of Amgen Limited Korea.

Supplementary material

774_2019_1052_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (206 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 206 kb)

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society Bone and Mineral Research and Springer Japan KK, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of PharmacySungkyunkwan UniversitySuwonSouth Korea
  2. 2.Amgen Korea LimitedSeoulSouth Korea
  3. 3.Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal MedicineNational Health Insurance Service Ilsan HospitalGoyangSouth Korea

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