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Complete genome sequence of aglaonema bacilliform virus (ABV)

  • R. A. Alvarez-QuintoEmail author
  • B. E. L. Lockhart
  • J. M. Moreno-Martinez
  • N. E. Olszewski
Annotated Sequence Record
  • 57 Downloads

Abstract

Aglaonema bacilliform virus (ABV), a member of the genus Badnavirus in the family Caulimoviridae, is associated with leaf deformation and chlorosis in Aglaonema modestum. The complete genome sequence of a Minnesota isolate of ABV was determined. The ABV genome is 7,178 bp in length and similar in size and organization to those of the members of the genus Badnavirus, containing three open reading frames (ORFs) with the potential to encode three proteins of 14.92, 13.33 and 207.95 kDa, respectively. The last ORF (ORF3) encodes a putative polyprotein with conserved domains, including zinc finger, aspartic protease, reverse transcriptase (RT) and RNase H domains, in that order. Phylogenetic analysis using the amino acid sequence of the ORF3 polyprotein showed that ABV clusters with several isolates of taro bacilliform CH virus (TaBCHV). Pairwise alignment using the highly conserved RT/RNase H region reveals that ABV has the highest level of identity (71%) at the nucleotide level to a Hawaiian isolate of TaBCHV.

Notes

Funding

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. Alvarez-Quinto R.A is supported by the Republic of Ecuador through the Ecuadorean Science and Technology Secretariat (SENESCYT).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

All the authors declare they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Plant PathologyUniversity of MinnesotaSt. PaulUSA
  2. 2.Department of Plant BiologyUniversity of MinnesotaSt. PaulUSA

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