Advertisement

High-throughput Luminex xMAP assay for simultaneous detection of antibodies against rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus, Sendai virus and rabbit rotavirus

  • Miaoli Wu
  • Lei Ma
  • Feng Cong
  • Yujun Zhu
  • Fengjiao Xu
  • Yuexiao Lian
  • Bihong Huang
  • Li Xiao
  • Meili Chen
  • Yu Zhang
  • Ren Huang
  • Pengju GuoEmail author
Original Article
  • 16 Downloads

Abstract

Rabbits are widely used as models in biological research, and the pathogen status of rabbits used in studies can directly affect the results of experiments. Serological surveillance is the common monitoring method used in laboratory animals. A rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective high-throughput Luminex xMAP assay could be an attractive alternative to labor-intensive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. In this study, recombinant proteins from rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus and rabbit rotavirus and whole viral lysates of Sendai virus were used as coating antigens in an xMAP assay for the simultaneous detection of antibodies against these pathogens. The xMAP assay showed high specificity, with no cross-reaction with other pathogens. The coefficient of variation for intra-assay and inter-assay comparisons was less than 3% and 4%, respectively, indicating good repeatability and stability of the assay. The xMAP assay exhibited similar limits of detection for rabbit hemorrhagic virus and Sendai virus and was less sensitive for the detection of rabbit rotavirus when compared with commercial ELISA kits. A total of 52 clinical samples were tested simultaneously using both the xMAP assay and ELISA kits. The results obtained using these two methods were 100% coincident. In summary, the novel xMAP assay offers an alternative choice for rapid and sensitive high-throughput detection of antibodies in rabbit serum and can be used as a daily monitoring tool for laboratory animals.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The experiments were conceived and designed by YZ, RH and MLC. The experiments were performed by MLW, FC and YJZ. The samples were collected by BHH, YXL and LX. The data were analysed by LM and FJX. The manuscript was prepared by MLW and PJG.

Funding

This work was supported by the Science and Technology Planning Project of Guangdong Province, China (nos. 2017B030314171; 2017A070702001; 2018B030317001).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

All the authors declare that they do not have conflicts of interest.

Supplementary material

705_2019_4226_MOESM1_ESM.docx (504 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 503 kb)

References

  1. 1.
    Peng X, Knouse JA, Hernon KM (2015) Rabbit models for studying human infectious diseases. Comp Med 65(6):499–507Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Fan J, Kitajima S, Watanabe T, Xu J, Zhang J, Liu E, Chen YE (2015) Rabbit models for the study of human atherosclerosis: from pathophysiological mechanisms to translational medicine. Pharmacol Ther 146:104–119.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pharmthera.2014.09.009 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Tang C, Zhang Q, Li X, Fan N, Yang Y, Quan L, Lai L (2014) Targeted modification of CCR5 gene in rabbits by TALEN. Yi chuan (Hereditas) 36(4):360–368Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Cabore RN, Pierard D, Huygen K (2016) A Belgian serosurveillance/seroprevalence study of diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis using a Luminex xMAP technology-based pentaplex. Vaccines.  https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines4020016 Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Liu J, Kerr PJ, Strive T (2012) A sensitive and specific blocking ELISA for the detection of rabbit calicivirus RCV-A1 antibodies. Virol J 9:182.  https://doi.org/10.1186/1743-422X-9-182 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Parker JC, O’Beirne AJ, Collins MJ Jr (1979) Sensitivity of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, complement fixation, and hemagglutination inhibition serological tests for detection of Sendai virus antibody in laboratory mice. J Clin Microbiol 9(3):444–447Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Houser B (2012) Bio-Rad’s Bio-Plex(R) suspension array system, xMAP technology overview. Arch Physiol Biochem 118(4):192–196.  https://doi.org/10.3109/13813455.2012.705301 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Baker HN, Murphy R, Lopez E, Garcia C (2012) Conversion of a capture ELISA to a Luminex xMAP assay using a multiplex antibody screening method. J Vis Exp JoVE.  https://doi.org/10.3791/4084 Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Reslova N, Michna V, Kasny M, Mikel P, Kralik P (2017) xMAP technology: applications in detection of pathogens. Front Microbiol 8:55.  https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2017.00055 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Laamiri N, Fallgren P, Zohari S, Ben Ali J, Ghram A, Leijon M, Hmila I (2016) Accurate detection of avian respiratory viruses by use of multiplex PCR-based Luminex suspension microarray assay. J Clin Microbiol 54(11):2716–2725.  https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00610-16 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Rausch TK, Schillert A, Ziegler A, Luking A, Zucht HD, Schulz-Knappe P (2016) Comparison of pre-processing methods for multiplex bead-based immunoassays. BMC Genom 17(1):601.  https://doi.org/10.1186/s12864-016-2888-7 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Bovers M, Diaz MR, Hagen F, Spanjaard L, Duim B, Visser CE, Hoogveld HL, Scharringa J, Hoepelman IM, Fell JW, Boekhout T (2007) Identification of genotypically diverse Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii isolates by Luminex xMAP technology. J Clin Microbiol 45(6):1874–1883.  https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00223-07 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Wang H, Cong F, Guan J, Xiao L, Zhu Y, Lian Y, Huang R, Chen M, Guo P (2018) Development of a sensitive and specific xMAP assay for detection of antibodies against infectious laryngotracheitis and bronchitis viruses. Virol J 15(1):146.  https://doi.org/10.1186/s12985-018-1048-x CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Gu AD, Lu LX, Xie YB, Chen LZ, Feng QS, Kang T, Jia WH, Zeng YX (2009) Clinical values of multiple Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) serological biomarkers detected by xMAP technology. J Transl Med 7:73.  https://doi.org/10.1186/1479-5876-7-73 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Heming JD, Huffman JB, Jones LM, Homa FL (2014) Isolation and characterization of the herpes simplex virus 1 terminase complex. J Virol 88(1):225–236.  https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02632-13 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Karanikola SN, Krucken J, Ramunke S, de Waal T, Hoglund J, Charlier J, Weber C, Muller E, Kowalczyk SJ, Kaba J, von Samson-Himmelstjerna G, Demeler J (2015) Development of a multiplex fluorescence immunological assay for the simultaneous detection of antibodies against Cooperia oncophora, Dictyocaulus viviparus and Fasciola hepatica in cattle. Parasites Vectors 8:335.  https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-015-0924-0 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Xu L, Jiang X, Zhu Y, Duan Y, Huang T, Huang Z, Liu C, Xu B, Xie Z (2018) A multiplex asymmetric reverse transcription-PCR assay combined with an electrochemical DNA sensor for simultaneously detecting and subtyping influenza A viruses. Front Microbiol 9:1405.  https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2018.01405 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Cong F, Zhu Y, Liu X, Li X, Chen M, Huang R, Guo P (2018) Development of an xTAG-multiplex PCR array for the detection of four avian respiratory viruses. Mol Cell Probes 37:1–5.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mcp.2017.10.002 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Xu F, Yuan W, Zhang T, Zhu Y, Lian Y, Zhang Y, Huang R, Guo P (2017) Simultaneous detection of 4 prototypic rat parvoviruses using the Luminex xTAG assay in laboratory animal health monitoring. J Virol Methods 248:61–65.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jviromet.2017.05.017 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Wu M, Zhu Y, Cong F, Rao D, Yuan W, Wang J, Huang B, Lian Y, Zhang Y, Huang R, Guo P (2018) Rapid detection of three rabbit pathogens by use of the Luminex x-TAG assay. BMC Vet Res 14(1):127.  https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-018-1438-8 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Ayouba A, Toure A, Butel C, Keita AK, Binetruy F, Sow MS, Foulongne V, Delaporte E, Peeters M (2017) Development of a sensitive and specific serological assay based on Luminex technology for detection of antibodies to Zaire ebolavirus. J Clin Microbiol 55(1):165–176.  https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01979-16 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Zhu J, Wang B, Miao Q, Tan Y, Li C, Chen Z, Guo H, Liu G (2015) Viral genome-linked protein (VPg) is essential for translation initiation of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV). PLoS One 10(11):e0143467.  https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0143467 CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miaoli Wu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lei Ma
    • 1
  • Feng Cong
    • 1
  • Yujun Zhu
    • 1
  • Fengjiao Xu
    • 1
  • Yuexiao Lian
    • 1
  • Bihong Huang
    • 1
  • Li Xiao
    • 1
  • Meili Chen
    • 1
  • Yu Zhang
    • 1
  • Ren Huang
    • 1
  • Pengju Guo
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Guangdong Laboratory Animal Monitoring InstituteGuangzhouChina
  2. 2.Guangdong Key Laboratory of Laboratory AnimalsGuangzhouChina

Personalised recommendations