Advertisement

Archives of Virology

, Volume 164, Issue 4, pp 1085–1094 | Cite as

Identification and molecular characterization of Serratia marcescens phages vB_SmaA_2050H1 and vB_SmaM_2050HW

  • Changyu Tian
  • Jiangtao Zhao
  • Zheng Zhang
  • Xiao Chen
  • Xiao Wei
  • Huan Li
  • Weishi Lin
  • Yuehua Ke
  • Lingfei Hu
  • Aimin Jiang
  • Ruo Feng
  • Wenhui Yang
  • Ying Jing
  • Jing Yuan
  • Yanping LuoEmail author
  • Xiangna ZhaoEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Serratia marcescens is a rod-shaped, Gram-negative bacterium causing nosocomially acquired infections. Bacteriophages are natural opponents of their pathogenic bacterial hosts and could be an alternative to traditional antibiotic treatments. In this study, two S. marcescens-specific bacteriophages, vB_SmaA_2050H1 and vB_SmaM_2050HW, were isolated from two different waste samples in China. Phage plaque assays, transmission electron microscopy, host-range determination, and one-step growth curve analyses were performed for both phages. vB_SmaA_2050H1 was classified as belonging to the family Ackermannviridae, and vB_SmaM_2050HW was classified as belonging to the family Myoviridae. One-step growth curve analysis showed that the latent and rise period of vB_SmaA_2050H1 were 80 min and 50 min, respectively, with a burst size of approximately 103 phage particles per infected cell. For vB_SmaM_2050HW, latent and rise periods of 40 min and 60 min, respectively, were determined, with a burst size of approximately 110 phage particles per infected cell. vB_SmaA_2050H1 infected 10 of the 15 (66.67%) S. marcescens strains tested, while vB_SmaM_2050HW infected 12 (80%) of the strains. Whole-genome sequencing and annotation of each of the phage genomes revealed genome sizes of 159,631 bp and 276,025 bp for vB_SmaA_2050H1 and vB_SmaM_2050HW, respectively, with the respective genomes containing 213 and 363 putative open reading frames. Sequence analysis of the genomes revealed that vB_SmaA_2050H1 is a member of the ViI-like family, while vB_SmaM_2050HW is a novel virulent bacteriophage. These findings provide further insights into the genomic structures of S. marcescens bacteriophages.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the Center for Biological Imaging (CBI), Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Science, for electron microscopy work, and we are grateful to Deyin Fan for his help in making EM samples. We thank Tamsin Sheen, PhD, from Liwen Bianji, Edanz Editing China (http://www.liwenbianji.cn/ac), for editing the English text of a draft of this manuscript.

Author contributions

CT and JZ did the experiments and contributed equally to this study as joint first authors. ZZ, XC, XW, HL, WL, YK, AJ, LH, WY, YJ and YL analyzed the data. FR and JY provided the bacterial strains. XZ managed the project and designed the experiments. CT, JZ and XZ wrote the article.

Funding

This work received support from National Natural Science Foundation of (China Grant 31670174).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no potential conflicts of interest.

Availability of data and materials

The sequences of vB_SmaA_2050H1and vB_SmaM_2050HW were submitted to the GenBank nucleotide sequence database under accession numbers MF285619 and MF285618.

Research involving human participants and/or animals

This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

Supplementary material

705_2019_4169_MOESM1_ESM.docx (86 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 86 kb)

References

  1. 1.
    Casey E et al (2017) Genome sequence of serratia marcescens phage BF. Genome Announc 5(23):e00211-17CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Anderson MT et al (2017) Capsule production and glucose metabolism dictate fitness during Serratia marcescens bacteremia. MBio 8(3):e00740-17CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Anderson MT, Mitchell LA, Mobley HLT (2017) Cysteine biosynthesis controls Serratia marcescens phospholipase activity. J Bacteriol 30:JB-00159Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Denyes JM et al (2014) The genome and proteome of Serratia bacteriophage eta which forms unstable lysogens. Virol J 11:6CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Teng T et al (2018) Complete genome sequence analysis of PS2, a novel T4-like bacteriophage that infects Serratia marcescens clinical isolates. Arch Virol 163(7):1997–2000CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Hao Y et al (2018) Complete genome sequence of bacteriophage SM9-3Y infecting Serratia marcescens. Genome Announc 6(1):e01270-17CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Peng F et al (2014) Characterization, sequencing and comparative genomic analysis of vB_AbaM-IME-AB2, a novel lytic bacteriophage that infects multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates. BMC Microbiol 14:181CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Germida JJ, Casida LE (1983) Ensifer adhaerens predatory activity against other bacteria in soil, as monitored by indirect phage analysis. Appl Environ Microbiol 45(4):1380–1388Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Adams H (1959) Methods of study of bacterial viruses. In: Bacteriophages. Interscience Publishers, London, pp 447–448Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Kutter E (2009) Phage host range and efficiency of plating. Methods Mol Biol 501:141–149CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Altschul SF et al (1997) Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs. Nucleic Acids Res 25(17):3389–3402CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Laslett D, Canback B (2004) ARAGORN, a program to detect tRNA genes and tmRNA genes in nucleotide sequences. Nucleic Acids Res 32(1):11–16CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Darling AC et al (2004) Mauve: multiple alignment of conserved genomic sequence with rearrangements. Genome Res 14(7):1394–1403CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Pajunen M, Kiljunen S, Skurnik M (2000) Bacteriophage phiYeO3-12, specific for Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3, is related to coliphages T3 and T7. J Bacteriol 182(18):5114–5120CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Ackermann HW (2009) Basic phage electron microscopy. Methods Mol Biol 501:113–126CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Matilla MA, Salmond GP (2014) Bacteriophage varphiMAM1, a viunalikevirus, is a broad-host-range, high-efficiency generalized transducer that infects environmental and clinical isolates of the enterobacterial genera Serratia and Kluyvera. Appl Environ Microbiol 80(20):6446–6457CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Hooton SP et al (2011) Salmonella typhimurium-specific bacteriophage PhiSH19 and the origins of species specificity in the Vi01-like phage family. Virol J 8:498CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Park M et al (2012) Characterization and comparative genomic analysis of a novel bacteriophage, SFP10, simultaneously inhibiting both Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli O157:H7. Appl Environ Microbiol 78(1):58–69CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Anany H et al (2011) A Shigella boydii bacteriophage which resembles Salmonella phage ViI. Virol J 8:242CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Kutter EM et al (2011) Characterization of a ViI-like phage specific to Escherichia coli O157:H7. Virol J 8:430CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Adriaenssens E, Brister JR (2017) How to name and classify your phage: an informal guide. Viruses 9(4):40CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Ackermann HW (2009) Phage classification and characterization. Methods Mol Biol 501:127CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Huang YJ, Parker MM, Belfort M (1999) Role of exonucleolytic degradation in group I intron homing in phage T4. Genetics 153(4):1501–1512Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Matilla MA, Salmond GP (2012) Complete genome sequence of Serratia plymuthica bacteriophage PhiMAM1. J Virol 86(24):13872–13873CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Pickard D et al (2010) A conserved acetyl esterase domain targets diverse bacteriophages to the Vi capsular receptor of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. J Bacteriol 192(21):5746–5754CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Meczker K et al (2014) The genome of the Erwinia amylovora phage PhiEaH1 reveals greater diversity and broadens the applicability of phages for the treatment of fire blight. FEMS Microbiol Lett 350(1):25–27CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Kim SH et al (2012) Complete genome sequence of Salmonella bacteriophage SS3e. J Virol 86(18):10253–10254CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Matsuda T et al (2005) Lysis-deficient bacteriophage therapy decreases endotoxin and inflammatory mediator release and improves survival in a murine peritonitis model. Surgery 137(6):639–646CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Changyu Tian
    • 1
  • Jiangtao Zhao
    • 2
  • Zheng Zhang
    • 3
  • Xiao Chen
    • 3
  • Xiao Wei
    • 1
  • Huan Li
    • 1
  • Weishi Lin
    • 1
  • Yuehua Ke
    • 1
  • Lingfei Hu
    • 4
  • Aimin Jiang
    • 3
  • Ruo Feng
    • 2
  • Wenhui Yang
    • 4
  • Ying Jing
    • 5
  • Jing Yuan
    • 1
  • Yanping Luo
    • 5
    Email author
  • Xiangna Zhao
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Institute of Disease Control and PreventionChina PLABeijingChina
  2. 2.Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical SciencesZhengzhou UniversityZhengzhouChina
  3. 3.College of Food ScienceSouth China Agricultural UniversityGuangzhouChina
  4. 4.State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and BiosecurityBeijing Institute of Microbiology and EpidemiologyBeijingChina
  5. 5.Medical Laboratory CenterGeneral Hospital of People’s Liberation ArmyBeijingChina

Personalised recommendations