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Plant Systematics and Evolution

, Volume 305, Issue 7, pp 563–568 | Cite as

Evidence for fungal sequence contamination in plant transcriptome databases

  • Gabor L. IgloiEmail author
Short Communication
  • 41 Downloads

Abstract

Sequences aligning partially with plant arginyl-tRNA synthetase but that showed unexpected mitochondrial characteristics, which do not occur in plants, have been detected in the plant transcriptome database. BLAST screening of this database with vertebrate nuclear-encoded mitochondrial arginyl-tRNA synthetase revealed a set of 23 sequences that on further analysis showed high similarity to fungal genomic DNA. A detailed knowledge of the gene organization of plant arginyl-tRNA synthetase and being aware of the mitochondrial origin of fungal cytoplasmic arginyl-tRNA synthetases have provided convincing evidence that the NCBI plant transcriptome (TSA) database is contaminated with data from fungal material.

Keywords

Arginyl-tRNA synthetase Database contamination Fungal RNA Mitochondrial gene Plant transcriptome 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The author declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

606_2019_1586_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (96 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 95 kb)
606_2019_1586_MOESM2_ESM.pdf (101 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (PDF 100 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of BiologyUniversity of FreiburgFreiburgGermany

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