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Comparative Clinical Pathology

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 1153–1163 | Cite as

Comparative study on hemato-biochemical alterations and selected acute phase protein response in native sheep experimentally infected with bluetongue virus serotypes 10 and 24

  • Vineetha Sobharani
  • Karam Pal SinghEmail author
  • Madhulina Maity
  • Gaurav Kumar Sharma
  • M. Saminathan
  • Diptimayee Sahoo
  • Rohit Singh
  • Jaynudin Hajibhai Khorajiya
  • Sushila Maan
  • N. S. Maan
  • P. P. Rao
  • K. Putty
  • Y. Krishnajyothi
  • Y. N. Reddy
  • V. K. Gupta
  • P. P. Mertens
Original Article
  • 23 Downloads

Abstract

Bluetongue (BT) is an infectious, non-contagious, insect-transmitted viral disease of sheep, other domestic, and wild ruminants caused by bluetongue virus (BTV), a prototype species of the genus Orbivirus of the family Reoviridae. The study was designed to determine the hematological and biochemical alterations and acute phase protein response in BTV sero-negative sheep experimentally infected with bluetongue virus serotype-10 and 24. The BTV-infected group comprising of 18 animals, 6 each inoculated with 6 ml of clarified virus containing 1 × 106/ml TCID50 of BTV-10 or 24 by intradermal route, 6 animals inoculated with equal volumes of BTV-10 and 24 and 4 animals with 6 ml of mock infected culture fluid served as uninfected control group. The blood and serum samples were analyzed at 0, 1, 3, 7, 11, and 16 days post-infection (DPI). Hematological findings in this study showed a significant decrease in the total number of white blood cells in BTV-10 infected group, a significant increase in circulating neutrophils decrease in lymphocytes in all the infected groups, in PCV in BTV-24 and co-infected groups, and RBC count in only BTV-24-infected group at 11 DPI. The results of serum biochemical analyses of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) exhibited increased levels in BTV-24 and co-infected animals. A significant rise in the serum level of creatine kinase (CK) was observed from 3 DPI in the infected groups. Serum levels of total proteins decreased significantly at 11 DPI in BTV-24 infected animals. Significant increase in CRP and fibrinogen levels was observed at 7 and 11 DPI in the infected groups. The significantly decreased levels of TLC, hemoglobin, PCV, CK, and acute phase proteins such as fibrinogen and CRP indicated the inflammatory changes associated with the virus replication and the consequent vascular damage and inflammatory changes in the tissues. Further, the variations in the hemato-biochemical and acute phase response observed between the two serotypes BTV-10 and 24 probes to the difference in virulence and pathogenesis of the serotypes in infected sheep.

Keywords

BTV-10 serotype BTV-24 serotype Experimental infection Hematology Serum biochemistry Acute phase response 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Director, Joint Directors and Head, Department of Pathology, ICAR-IVRI for providing all the facilities to carry out this research work.

Funding information

This study was supported by research grant from AINP-BT (Grant No. 3(8)/98 ASR-IV, dated 23 March 2001) and DBT-BBSRC (Grant No. BT/IN/Indo-UK/FADH/46/SM/2013, dated 8 September 2014), CADRAD, ICAR-IVRI, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approvals

All procedures performed in studies involving animals were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institution or practice at which the studies were conducted. Experimental animals used for this research have been approved by the IAEC (ICAR-IVRI) and CPCSEA with Ethical Clearance Certificate’s Number: 25/21/2017-CPCSEA dated 20 October 2017.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vineetha Sobharani
    • 1
    • 2
  • Karam Pal Singh
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Madhulina Maity
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gaurav Kumar Sharma
    • 1
  • M. Saminathan
    • 2
  • Diptimayee Sahoo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rohit Singh
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jaynudin Hajibhai Khorajiya
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sushila Maan
    • 3
  • N. S. Maan
    • 4
  • P. P. Rao
    • 5
  • K. Putty
    • 6
  • Y. Krishnajyothi
    • 7
  • Y. N. Reddy
    • 8
  • V. K. Gupta
    • 1
  • P. P. Mertens
    • 9
  1. 1.ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research InstituteCentre for Animal Disease Research and DiagnosisBareillyIndia
  2. 2.Division of PathologyICAR-Indian Veterinary Research InstituteBareillyIndia
  3. 3.Animal BiotechnologyLLR University of Veterinary and Animal SciencesHisarIndia
  4. 4.Animal NutritionLLR University of Veterinary and Animal SciencesHisarIndia
  5. 5.Ella FoundationHyderabadIndia
  6. 6.Animal BiotechnologyPVNVTUHyderabadIndia
  7. 7.Veterinary Biological and Research InstituteVijayawadaIndia
  8. 8.MicrobiologyPVNTVUHyderabadIndia
  9. 9.School of Veterinary Medicine and ScienceThe University of NottinghamNottinghamUK

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