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Non-woven fabric-based microfluidic devices with hydrophobic wax barrier

  • Jing Zhang
  • Xianbo QiuEmail author
  • Lei Huang
  • Yiqiang Fan
  • Guijun Miao
  • Lulu Zhang
  • Chi Xu
  • Luyao Liu
  • Xiaobin Dong
Technical Paper
  • 19 Downloads

Abstract

This study proposed a novel method for the fabrication of non-woven based microfluidic devices with a wax hydrophobic barrier. Current microfluidic devices were fabricated with glass or polymer material, and paper is also widely used for the fabrication of low-cost microfluidic devices. The application of non-woven fabric based microfluidic devices provides a new option of bulk materials for microfluidics. Compared with the glass or polymer material used in microfluidics, non-woven fabric is low-cost, easy to process and disposable. Fluid can penetrate through the non-woven fabric material with capillary force without the requirement of external pumps. As fiber-based material, comparing with paper, non-woven fabric material is more durable with higher mechanical strength, and various types of non-woven fabric material also provide a board choice of surface chemical/physical properties for microfluidic applications. In this study, the hydrophilic non-woven fabric is chosen as the bulk material for microfluidic devices, a wax pattern transfer protocol is also proposed in this study for the deposition of hydrophobic barriers. For a demonstration of the proposed fabrication technique, a microfluidic mixer was also fabricated in this study.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (81871505, 61571420).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jing Zhang
    • 1
  • Xianbo Qiu
    • 1
    Email author
  • Lei Huang
    • 2
  • Yiqiang Fan
    • 2
    • 3
  • Guijun Miao
    • 1
  • Lulu Zhang
    • 1
  • Chi Xu
    • 1
  • Luyao Liu
    • 1
  • Xiaobin Dong
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Information Science and TechnologyBeijing University of Chemical TechnologyBeijingChina
  2. 2.School of Mechanical and Electrical EngineeringBeijing University of Chemical TechnologyBeijingChina
  3. 3.School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS)Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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