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Characterization of MEMS comb capacitor

  • Farooq AhmadEmail author
  • Athar Baig
  • John Ojur Dennis
  • Nor Hisham Bin Hamid
  • M. Haris Bin Md Khir
Technical Paper
  • 14 Downloads

Abstract

With the advancement of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technologies, it is compulsory to have the sources which power the micro devices at micron scale. Due to the miniaturization, compactness, inexpensive and ease of integration with the standard process compatibility, CMOS-MEMS capacitor is characterized. There are two major parts of characterization; static mode and dynamic mode. The moveable shuttle remains in static mode until the input voltage reaches to 50 V. In static mode, due to constant capacitance among stator and shuttle fingers, charge accumulates up to 1.17 pC and level of energy stored does not go so high. The shuttle fingers initially overlap with the stator fingers by 30 μm but in dynamic mode when the voltage raises above 50 V, moveable shuttle starts moving and fingers overlapping distance reaches to 50 μm with the increase in voltage of approximately 307 V. In dynamic mode, stored energy level increases from 30 to 1800 pJ. The stored energy increases exponentially in dynamic mode due to the increased overlapping of the fingers and against elastic forces of beams (1, 2, 3 and 4).

Notes

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Farooq Ahmad
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Athar Baig
    • 1
  • John Ojur Dennis
    • 3
  • Nor Hisham Bin Hamid
    • 2
  • M. Haris Bin Md Khir
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Electrical EngineeringUniversity of Engineering and TechnologyLahorePakistan
  2. 2.Department of Electrical and Electronic EngineeringUniversiti Teknologi PETRONASTronohMalaysia
  3. 3.Department of Fundamental and Applied SciencesUniversiti Teknologi PETRONASTronohMalaysia

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