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Supportive Care in Cancer

, Volume 26, Issue 6, pp 1699–1701 | Cite as

Sexual health in patients with hematological malignancies: a neglected issue

  • Pasquale NiscolaEmail author
  • Fabio Efficace
  • Elisabetta Abruzzese
Commentary

Abstract

Current evidence, although limited, outlines that sexual dysfunction may represent a prominent part of the symptom burden experienced by the patients with hematologic malignancies (HM). However, despite their presumed negative effects on quality of life (QoL), sexual health is not typically considered in the QoL assessment of HM patients. In addition, very few studies have been conducted in this area. Therefore, it would be important to further investigate how newer drugs developed in recent years for patients with HM, including targeted therapies and impact on sexual health, and how this influence overall patients’ QoL outcomes.

Keywords

Hematological malignancies Leukemia Lymphoma Sexual health Quality of life 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hematology UnitSant’Eugenio HospitalRomeItaly
  2. 2.Data Center and Health Outcomes Research UnitItalian Group for Adult Hematologic Diseases (GIMEMA)RomeItaly

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