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Supportive Care in Cancer

, Volume 25, Issue 11, pp 3289–3290 | Cite as

Critical review of current clinical practice guidelines for antifungal therapy in paediatric haematology and oncology

  • Christopher C BlythEmail author
  • Gabrielle M Haeusler
  • Brendan J McMullan
  • Rishi S Kotecha
  • Monica A Slavin
  • Julia E Clark
Letter to the editor
  • 277 Downloads

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

Prof Slavin has received investigator initiated funds from Merck and has previously been a member of advisory boards and speakers bureaus for Merck and Gilead Sciences. A/Prof Clark has previously received investigator-initiated research funds from Gilead. No funding was received in the preparation of this manuscript. Human ethics approval nor informed consent was required for this manuscript.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher C Blyth
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Gabrielle M Haeusler
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • Brendan J McMullan
    • 7
    • 8
  • Rishi S Kotecha
    • 1
    • 9
    • 10
  • Monica A Slavin
    • 5
    • 11
    • 12
  • Julia E Clark
    • 13
    • 14
  1. 1.School of MedicineUniversity of Western AustraliaPerthAustralia
  2. 2.Wesfarmers Centre for Vaccines and Infectious Diseases, Telethon Kids InstituteUniversity of Western AustraliaPerthAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Infectious Diseases and PathWest Laboratory MedicinePrincess Margaret Hospital for ChildrenPerthAustralia
  4. 4.Paediatric Integrated Cancer ServiceMelbourneAustralia
  5. 5.Department of Infectious DiseasesPeter MacCallum Cancer CentreMelbourneAustralia
  6. 6.Department of Infection and Immunity, Monash Children’s Hospital and Department of PaediatricsMonash UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  7. 7.Department of Immunology and Infectious DiseasesSydney Children’s HospitalSydneyAustralia
  8. 8.School of Women’s and Children’s HealthUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  9. 9.Department of Clinical Haematology and OncologyPrincess Margaret Hospital for ChildrenPerthAustralia
  10. 10.Telethon Kids Cancer Centre, Telethon Kids InstituteUniversity of Western AustraliaPerthAustralia
  11. 11.Victorian Infectious Diseases ServiceRoyal Melbourne HospitalMelbourneAustralia
  12. 12.Department of MedicineUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  13. 13.Infection Management Prevention ServiceLady Cilento Children’s HospitalBrisbaneAustralia
  14. 14.School of MedicineUniversity of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia

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