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Y-chromosome lineages in Cabo Verde Islands witness the diverse geographic origin of its first male settlers

Human Genetics (2003) s00439-003-1007-4

After publication, the authors were alerted to ambiguous results in assaying marker 12f2. The lack of a distinct band defines haplogroup J lineages that can be a false-negative case when DNA is of poor quality and when using different DNA or primer concentrations. All J-chromosomes were typed using a phylogenetically equivalent binary SNP marker M304, described in: C. Cinnioglu, R. King, T. Kivisild, E. Kalfoglu, S. Atasoy, G.L. Cavalleri, A.S. Lillie, C.C. Roseman, A.A. Lin, K. Prince, P.J. Oefner, P. Shen, O. Semino, L.. Cavalli-Sforza, P.A. Underhill (2003) Excavating Y-chromosome haplotype strata in Anatolia; Human Genetics (in press). The new marker is straightforward and gives no ambiguous results. The Y-chromosomes previously mistyped as J* turned out to be unclassified lineages of haplogroup F(xI,J,K).

The changes, however, do not alter the main conclusion. A PCA performed with the inclusion of this new group does not differ substantially from the one originally presented. Y-chromosome retyping of “J*” lineages using M304 marker (Table 1).

Table 1.  

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Correspondence to António Brehm.

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The online version of the original article can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00439-003-1007-4

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Gonçalves, R., Rosa, A., Freitas, A. et al. Y-chromosome lineages in Cabo Verde Islands witness the diverse geographic origin of its first male settlers. Hum Genet 113, 559 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00439-003-1037-y

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