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Parasitology Research

, Volume 83, Issue 7, pp 706–711 | Cite as

Experimental infection of nude mice as a model for Sarcocystisneurona-associated encephalitis

  • Antoinette E. Marsh
  • Bradd C. Barr
  • Jeffrey Lakritz
  • Robert Nordhausen
  • John E. Madigan
  • Patricia A. Conrad
ORIGINAL PAPER

Abstract

The development of a rodent model for the study of Sarcocystisneurona encephalitis is described. Animal models have been developed for a number of protozoal parasites; however, no such model exists for S. neurona. The approach used in this study is similar to that employed for other closely related protozoal parasites such as Neosporacaninum and Toxoplasmagondii. A time course of infection was examined, and histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and parasite isolation were used to examine the pathogenesis and follow the infection from 1 to 6 weeks postinoculation. S.neurona was associated with the development of encephalitis in these mice, and the immune status determined the susceptibility of these mice to S. neurona-associated encephalitis.

Keywords

Animal Model Nude Mouse Encephalitis Rodent Model Immune Status 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antoinette E. Marsh
    • 1
  • Bradd C. Barr
    • 2
  • Jeffrey Lakritz
    • 3
  • Robert Nordhausen
    • 2
  • John E. Madigan
    • 4
  • Patricia A. Conrad
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8745, USA Fax:+1-916-752-3349; email: paconrad@ucdavis.eduUS
  2. 2.California Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory System, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8745, USAUS
  3. 3.Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8745, USAUS
  4. 4.Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8745, USAUS

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