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Vermamoeba vermiformis in hospital network: a benefit for Aeromonas hydrophila

  • Vincent DelafontEmail author
  • Estelle Perraud
  • Kévin Brunet
  • Elodie Maisonneuve
  • Sihem Kaaki
  • Marie-Hélène Rodier
Protozoology - Short Communication
  • 24 Downloads

Abstract

Aeromonas hydrophila, considered as an emerging pathogen, is increasingly involved in opportunistic human infections. This bacterium, mainly present in aquatic environments, can therefore develop relationships with the free-living amoeba Vermamoeba vermiformis in hospital water networks. We showed in this study that the joint presence of V. vermiformis and A. hydrophila led to an increased bacterial growth in the first 48 h of contact and moreover to the protection of the bacteria in adverse conditions even after 28 days. These results highlight the fact that strategies should be implemented to control the development of FLA in hospital water systems.

Keywords

Vermamoeba vermiformis Free-living amoebae Aeromonas hydrophila Water Environment 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We wish to thank Mr. Jeffrey Arsham for revising the English text.

Authors’ contributions

MHR designed the study. MHR, EM, EP, and SK performed experiments. VD and MHR analyzed the data. MHR and VD wrote the manuscript. VD, EP, EM, KB, and MHR reviewed and edited the manuscript.

Funding information

Our laboratory is partly supported by the region Nouvelle Aquitaine and Europe through the CPER-FEDER program.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratoire Ecologie et Biologie des Interactions, UMR CNRS 7267Université de PoitiersPoitiersFrance
  2. 2.Laboratoire de Parasitologie et MycologieCHU de PoitiersPoitiersFrance
  3. 3.Inserm U1070, Pôle Biologie SantéPoitiersFrance
  4. 4.EA BIOS 4691Université de Reims Champagne-ArdenneReimsFrance
  5. 5.Unité de pathologie ultrastructurale et expérimentale, Laboratoire d’anatomie et cytologie pathologiquesCHU la MilètriePoitiersFrance

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