Radiation and Environmental Biophysics

, Volume 57, Issue 2, pp 169–177 | Cite as

Radiation dose rates of differentiated thyroid cancer patients after 131I therapy

  • Pingyan Jin
  • Huijuan Feng
  • Wei Ouyang
  • Juqing Wu
  • Pan Chen
  • Jing Wang
  • Yungang Sun
  • Jialang Xian
  • Liuhua Huang
Original Article
  • 58 Downloads

Abstract

Postoperative 131I treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) can create a radiation hazard for nearby persons. The present prospective study aimed to investigate radiation dose rates in 131I-treated DTC patients to provide references for radiation protection. A total of 141 131I-treated DTC patients were enrolled, and grouped into a singular treatment (ST) group and a repeated treatment (RT) group. The radiation dose rate of 131I-treated patients was measured. The rate of achieving discharge compliance and restricted contact time were analyzed based on Chinese regulations. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the independent factors associated with the clearance of radioiodine. The rate of achieving discharge compliance (131I retention < 400 MBq) was 79.8 and 93.7% at day 2 (D2) for the ST and RT groups, respectively, and reached 100% at D7 and D4, respectively. The restricted contact time with 131I-treated patients at 0.5 m for medical staff, caregivers, family members, and the general public ranged from 4 to 7 days. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the 24-h iodine uptake rate was the only significant factor associated with radioiodine clearance. For the radiation safety of 131I-treated DTC patients, the present results can provide radiometric data for radiation protection.

Keywords

Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) 131I treatment Radiation safety Radioiodine clearance Contact time restrictions 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported by a grant from the Guangdong Province Science and Technology Plan Projects (No. 2016A070714008).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pingyan Jin
    • 1
  • Huijuan Feng
    • 2
  • Wei Ouyang
    • 2
  • Juqing Wu
    • 2
  • Pan Chen
    • 2
  • Jing Wang
    • 2
  • Yungang Sun
    • 2
  • Jialang Xian
    • 2
  • Liuhua Huang
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Nuclear Medicine, People’s Hospital of Yuxi CityThe Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical UniversityYuxiChina
  2. 2.Department of Nuclear MedicineZhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical UniversityGuangzhouChina

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