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Effects of Ongoing Feedback During a 12-Month Maintenance Walking Program on Daily Physical Activity in People with COPD

  • Sally L. WoottonEmail author
  • Kylie Hill
  • Jennifer A. Alison
  • Li Whye Cindy Ng
  • Sue Jenkins
  • Peter R. Eastwood
  • David R. Hillman
  • Christine Jenkins
  • Lissa M. Spencer
  • Nola Cecins
  • Zoe J. McKeough
COPD

Abstract

This multi-centred, randomised controlled trial explored the effects of adding ongoing feedback to a 12-month unsupervised maintenance walking program, on daily physical activity (PA) in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Participants were randomised to either an intervention group (IG) or a usual care group (UCG). During the maintenance program, the IG received ongoing feedback (telephone calls, biofeedback provided via pedometer and progressive goal setting) and the UCG received no feedback. The SenseWear® Pro3 Armband was used to measure PA. Of the 86 participants {IG = 42, (mean [SD]: age 70 [7] years; FEV1 43 [16] % predicted); UCG = 44, (age 69 [9] years; FEV1 44 [15] % predicted)} included at baseline, 43 had sufficient data to be included in the final analysis. There were no between-group differences in any of the PA variables from baseline to completion of the program (all p > 0.05). Ongoing feedback was no more effective than no feedback in improving PA during a 12-month unsupervised walking program.

Trial Registration: The trial was registered in the Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12609000472279).

Keywords

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Physical activity Pulmonary rehabilitation Exercise training 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the staff at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Concord Repatriation General Hospital, Prince of Wales Hospital, Manly Hospital, Hornsby Ku-ring-gai Hospital, Bentley Hospital and Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital for their assistance and support, and also thank the patients who participated in the study and thank Professor Jennifer Peat for statistical support.

Funding

The study was funded by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council project grant (570814).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

Peter R. Eastwood was funded by a National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) Senior Research Fellowship (1042341). All other authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

The study was approved by the ethics committees of Sydney South West Area Health Service, The University of Sydney, Curtin University, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital and Bentley Hospital.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sally L. Wootton
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Kylie Hill
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jennifer A. Alison
    • 1
    • 5
  • Li Whye Cindy Ng
    • 3
    • 6
  • Sue Jenkins
    • 3
    • 4
    • 7
  • Peter R. Eastwood
    • 3
    • 8
    • 9
  • David R. Hillman
    • 8
  • Christine Jenkins
    • 10
  • Lissa M. Spencer
    • 5
  • Nola Cecins
    • 7
  • Zoe J. McKeough
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Health SciencesThe University of SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Chronic Disease Community Rehabilitation ServiceNorthern Sydney Local Health DistrictNorth RydeAustralia
  3. 3.School of Physiotherapy and Exercise ScienceFaculty of Health Science, Curtin UniversityPerthAustralia
  4. 4.Institute for Respiratory HealthSir Charles Gairdner HospitalNedlandsAustralia
  5. 5.Sydney Local Health DistrictSydneyAustralia
  6. 6.Physiotherapy DepartmentSingapore General HospitalSingaporeSingapore
  7. 7.Physiotherapy DepartmentSir Charles Gairdner HospitalNedlandsAustralia
  8. 8.Department of Pulmonary Physiology & Sleep MedicineSir Charles Gairdner HospitalNedlandsAustralia
  9. 9.Centre for Sleep Science, School of Human SciencesUniversity of Western AustraliaPerthAustralia
  10. 10.Department of Thoracic MedicineConcord HospitalConcordAustralia

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