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Reply to: Modified cesarean hysterectomy technique for management of cases of placenta increta and percreta at a tertiary referral hospital in Egypt

  • David AtallahEmail author
  • Malak Moubarak
  • Nadine El Kassis
Correspondence

Dear Editors,

I want to congratulate Hussein et al. [1] for their extensive work. I am aware of the catastrophic figures of percreta due to the epidemics of cesarean section in their country. In fact, Egypt is the third country on the row considering the rate of cesarean section. The total Egyptian population is more than 100 million and the natality is approximately 4 per woman.

Lebanon is a smaller country with a similarly high rate of cesarean section. We organized the management of this disease by creating a network collaboration between three university hospitals that receive all cases from the whole country.

In my department, I extrapolated gynecologic oncology techniques to apply them in the management of percreta cases. In fact, as I have stated in my first letter in 2013, the disease is different from one patient to another and the management differs from a patient to another, opening the door for conservation [2]. The problem is percreta, when we have an anterior bladder...

Notes

Author contributions

DA: conceptualization, writing original draft, reviewing and editing. MM: writing original draft, reviewing and editing. NE: writing original draft, reviewing and editing.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

All the authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

References

  1. 1.
    Hussein AM, Kamel A, Raslan A, Dakhly DMR, Abdelhafeez A, Nabil M, Momtaz M (2019) Modified cesarean hysterectomy technique for management of cases of placenta increta and percreta at a tertiary referral hospital in Egypt. Arch Gynecol Obstet 299(3):695–702CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Atallah D, Safi J, Kassis NE (2013) Placenta accreta and beyond: Aesop’s fables. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 92:1430–1431CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Atallah D, Safi J, Kassis NE (2014) Placenta accreta and beyond: Aesop is not Zeus. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 93:432CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Matsubara S, Takahashi H, Takei Y. Modified hysterectomy for placenta increta and percreta: modifications of what? Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2019.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s00404-019-05114-y Google Scholar
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    Hussein A, Kamel A. Reply to the comments on “Modified hysterectomy for placenta increta and percreta: modifications of what?”. Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2019.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s00404-019-05118-8.Google Scholar
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    Atallah D, Moubarak M, Nassar M, Kassab B, Ghossain M, El Kassis N (2018) Case series of outcomes of a standardized surgical approach for placenta percreta for prevention of ureteral lesions. Int J Gynaecol Obstet 140(3):352–356CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Atallah D, Moubarak M, Saliba S, Nassar M, Abboud S, Kesrouani A, Ghossain M, Elkassis N (2018) Placental malformation: accreta and beyond. In: Ahmed RG (ed) Placenta. IntechOpen, London, pp 73–84Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hôtel-Dieu de France University Hospital Saint Joseph UniversityBeirutLebanon

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