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European Journal of Nutrition

, Volume 58, Issue 8, pp 3303–3312 | Cite as

Coffee and tea drinking in relation to the risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study

  • Raul Zamora-RosEmail author
  • Muath A. Alghamdi
  • Valerie Cayssials
  • Silvia Franceschi
  • Martin Almquist
  • Joakim Hennings
  • Maria Sandström
  • Konstantinos K. Tsilidis
  • Elisabete Weiderpass
  • Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault
  • Bodil Hammer Bech
  • Kim Overvad
  • Anne Tjønneland
  • Kristina E. N. Petersen
  • Francesca Romana Mancini
  • Yahya Mahamat-Saleh
  • Fabrice Bonnet
  • Tilman Kühn
  • Renée T. Fortner
  • Heiner Boeing
  • Antonia Trichopoulou
  • Christina Bamia
  • Georgia Martimianaki
  • Giovanna Masala
  • Sara Grioni
  • Salvatore Panico
  • Rosario Tumino
  • Francesca Fasanelli
  • Guri Skeie
  • Tonje Braaten
  • Cristina Lasheras
  • Elena Salamanca-Fernández
  • Pilar Amiano
  • Maria-Dolores Chirlaque
  • Aurelio Barricarte
  • Jonas Manjer
  • Peter Wallström
  • H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita
  • Petra H. Peeters
  • Kay-Thee Khaw
  • Nicholas J. Wareham
  • Julie A. Schmidt
  • Dagfinn Aune
  • Graham Byrnes
  • Augustin Scalbert
  • Antonio Agudo
  • Sabina Rinaldi
Original Contribution

Abstract

Purpose

Coffee and tea constituents have shown several anti-carcinogenic activities in cellular and animal studies, including against thyroid cancer (TC). However, epidemiological evidence is still limited and inconsistent. Therefore, we aimed to investigate this association in a large prospective study.

Methods

The study was conducted in the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) cohort, which included 476,108 adult men and women. Coffee and tea intakes were assessed through validated country-specific dietary questionnaires.

Results

During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 748 first incident differentiated TC cases (including 601 papillary and 109 follicular TC) were identified. Coffee consumption (per 100 mL/day) was not associated either with total differentiated TC risk (HRcalibrated 1.00, 95% CI 0.97–1.04) or with the risk of TC subtypes. Tea consumption (per 100 mL/day) was not associated with the risk of total differentiated TC (HRcalibrated 0.98, 95% CI 0.95–1.02) and papillary tumor (HRcalibrated 0.99, 95% CI 0.95–1.03), whereas an inverse association was found with follicular tumor risk (HRcalibrated 0.90, 95% CI 0.81–0.99), but this association was based on a sub-analysis with a small number of cancer cases.

Conclusions

In this large prospective study, coffee and tea consumptions were not associated with TC risk.

Keywords

Thyroid cancer Coffee Tea Intake Cohort EPIC 

Abbreviations

24-HDR

24-h dietary recall

BMI

Body mass index

CI

Confidence interval

EPIC

European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

HR

Hazard ratio

IARC

International Agency for Research on Cancer

NOS

Not otherwise specified

TC

Thyroid cancer

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Mr. Bertrand Hémon for his valuable help with the EPIC database. The authors also thank all participants in the EPIC cohorts for their invaluable contribution to the study.

Author contributions

RZ-R, SF, and SR designed the research; RZ-R, MAA, and VC performed the statistical analyses; RZ-R and MAA drafted the manuscript; SF, MA, JH, MS, KKT, EW, M-CB-R, GB, AS, AA, and SR contributed to the discussion. All authors reviewed, edited, and approved the final manuscript.

Funding

This study was supported by the Institute of Health Carlos III, Spain (CP15/00100), and cofounded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) “A way to build Europe”. The coordination of EPIC is financially supported by the European Commission (DG-SANCO) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The national cohorts are supported by Danish Cancer Society (Denmark); Ligue Contre le Cancer, Institut Gustave Roussy, Mutuelle Générale de l’Education Nationale, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) (France); German Cancer Aid, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) (Germany); the Hellenic Health Foundation (Greece); Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca sul Cancro-AIRC-Italy and National Research Council (Italy); Dutch Ministry of Public Health, Welfare and Sports (VWS), Netherlands Cancer Registry (NKR), LK Research Funds, Dutch Prevention Funds, Dutch ZON (Zorg Onderzoek Nederland), World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF), Statistics Netherlands (The Netherlands); Health Research Fund (FIS): PI13/00061 to Granada; PI13/01162 to EPIC-Murcia, Regional Governments of Andalucía, Asturias, Basque Country, Murcia and Navarra, AGAUR, Generalitat de Catalunya (exp. 2014 SGR 726), The Health Research Funds (RD12/0036/0018) (Spain); Swedish Cancer Society, Swedish Research Council and County Councils of Skåne and Västerbotten (Sweden); Cancer Research UK (14136 to EPIC-Norfolk; C570/A16491 and C8221/A19170 to EPIC-Oxford), Medical Research Council (1000143 to EPIC-Norfolk, MR/M012190/1 to EPIC-Oxford) (United Kingdom). RZ-R would like to thank the “Miguel Servet” program (CP15/00100) from the Institute of Health Carlos III (Spain) and the European Social Fund (ESF).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Zamora-Ros R, Alghamdi MA, Cayssials V, Franceschi S, Almquist M, Hennings J, Sandström M, Tsilidis KK, Weiderpass E, Boutron-Ruault M-C, Hammer Bech B, Overvad K, Tjønneland A, Petersen KEN, Mancini FR, Mahamat-Saleh Y, Bonnet F, Kühn T, Fortner RT, Boeing H, Trichopoulou A, Bamia C, Martimianaki G, Masala G, Grioni S, Panico S, Tumino R, Fasanelli F, Skeie G, Braaten T, Lasheras C, Salamanca-Fernández E, Amiano P, Chirlaque M-D, Barricarte A, Manjer J, Wallström P, Bueno-de-Mesquita HB, Peeters PH, Khaw K-T, Wareham NJ, Schmidt JA, Aune D, Byrnes G, Scalbert A, Agudo A, and Rinaldi S have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

394_2018_1874_MOESM1_ESM.docx (22 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 21 KB)
394_2018_1874_MOESM2_ESM.docx (17 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (DOCX 18 KB)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raul Zamora-Ros
    • 1
    Email author
  • Muath A. Alghamdi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Valerie Cayssials
    • 1
  • Silvia Franceschi
    • 3
  • Martin Almquist
    • 4
    • 5
  • Joakim Hennings
    • 6
  • Maria Sandström
    • 7
  • Konstantinos K. Tsilidis
    • 8
    • 9
  • Elisabete Weiderpass
    • 10
    • 11
    • 12
    • 13
  • Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault
    • 14
    • 15
  • Bodil Hammer Bech
    • 16
  • Kim Overvad
    • 16
  • Anne Tjønneland
    • 17
  • Kristina E. N. Petersen
    • 17
  • Francesca Romana Mancini
    • 14
    • 15
  • Yahya Mahamat-Saleh
    • 14
    • 15
  • Fabrice Bonnet
    • 14
    • 15
    • 18
  • Tilman Kühn
    • 19
  • Renée T. Fortner
    • 19
  • Heiner Boeing
    • 20
  • Antonia Trichopoulou
    • 21
    • 22
  • Christina Bamia
    • 21
    • 22
  • Georgia Martimianaki
    • 21
  • Giovanna Masala
    • 23
  • Sara Grioni
    • 24
  • Salvatore Panico
    • 25
  • Rosario Tumino
    • 26
  • Francesca Fasanelli
    • 27
  • Guri Skeie
    • 10
  • Tonje Braaten
    • 10
  • Cristina Lasheras
    • 28
  • Elena Salamanca-Fernández
    • 29
    • 30
  • Pilar Amiano
    • 30
    • 31
  • Maria-Dolores Chirlaque
    • 30
    • 32
    • 33
  • Aurelio Barricarte
    • 30
    • 34
    • 35
  • Jonas Manjer
    • 4
  • Peter Wallström
    • 36
  • H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita
    • 9
    • 37
    • 38
    • 39
  • Petra H. Peeters
    • 40
  • Kay-Thee Khaw
    • 41
  • Nicholas J. Wareham
    • 42
  • Julie A. Schmidt
    • 43
  • Dagfinn Aune
    • 9
  • Graham Byrnes
    • 44
  • Augustin Scalbert
    • 44
  • Antonio Agudo
    • 1
  • Sabina Rinaldi
    • 44
  1. 1.Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO)Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL)L’Hospitalet de LlobregatSpain
  2. 2.College of MedicineAl Imam Mohammed Ibn Saud Islamic UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia
  3. 3.Epidemiology UnitAviano Cancer CenterMilanItaly
  4. 4.Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital MalmöLund UniversityLundSweden
  5. 5.Malmö Diet and Cancer StudyUniversity Hospital MalmöMalmöSweden
  6. 6.Department of Surgical and Perioperative SciencesUmeå UniversityUmeåSweden
  7. 7.Department for Radiation SciencesUmeå UniversityUmeåSweden
  8. 8.Department of Hygiene and EpidemiologyUniversity of Ioannina School of MedicineIoanninaGreece
  9. 9.School of Public HealthImperial College LondonLondonUK
  10. 10.Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiTThe Arctic University of TromsøTromsöNorway
  11. 11.Department of Research, Cancer Registry of NorwayInstitute of Population-Based Cancer ResearchOsloNorway
  12. 12.Department of Medical Epidemiology and BiostatisticsKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  13. 13.Genetic Epidemiology GroupFolkhälsan Research CenterHelsinkiFinland
  14. 14.CESP, Université Paris-Sud, UVSQ, INSERM, Université Paris-SaclayVillejuifFrance
  15. 15.Institut Gustave RoussyVillejuifFrance
  16. 16.Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public HealthAarhus UniversityAarhusDenmark
  17. 17.Unit of Diet, Genes and EnvironmentDanish Cancer Society Research CenterCopenhagenDenmark
  18. 18.CHU Rennes, Université de Rennes 1RennesFrance
  19. 19.Division of Cancer EpidemiologyGerman Cancer Research CenterHeidelbergGermany
  20. 20.Department of EpidemiologyGerman Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-RehbrueckeNuthetalGermany
  21. 21.Hellenic Health FoundationAthensGreece
  22. 22.Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, School of MedicineNational and Kapodistrian University of AthensAthensGreece
  23. 23.Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology UnitCancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPOFlorenceItaly
  24. 24.Nutritional Epidemiology UnitFondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei TumoriMilanItaly
  25. 25.Department of Clinical and Experimental MedicineFederico II UniversityNaplesItaly
  26. 26.Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit“Civic M.P. Arezzo” Hospital, ASP RagusaRagusaItaly
  27. 27.Unit of Cancer EpidemiologyCittà della Salute e della Scienza University-Hospital and University of TurinTurinItaly
  28. 28.Department of Functional Biology, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of OviedoAsturiasSpain
  29. 29.Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GranadaHospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de GranadaGranadaSpain
  30. 30.CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP)MadridSpain
  31. 31.Public Health Division of GipuzkoaRegional Government of the Basque CountryDonostiaSpain
  32. 32.Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health CouncilIMIB-ArrixacaMurciaSpain
  33. 33.Department of Health and Social SciencesUniversidad de MurciaMurciaSpain
  34. 34.Navarra Public Health InstitutePamplonaSpain
  35. 35.Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA)PamplonaSpain
  36. 36.Nutrition Epidemiology Research Group, Department of Clinical SciencesLund UniversityMalmöSweden
  37. 37.Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD)National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM)BilthovenThe Netherlands
  38. 38.Department of Gastroenterology and HepatologyUniversity Medical CentreUtrechtThe Netherlands
  39. 39.Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of MalayaKuala LumpurMalaysia
  40. 40.Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary CareUniversity Medical Center UtrechtUtrechtThe Netherlands
  41. 41.Department of Public Health and Primary CareUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  42. 42.MRC Epidemiology Unit, School of Clinical MedicineUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  43. 43.Cancer Epidemiology UnitUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK
  44. 44.International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)LyonFrance

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