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Journal of Oceanology and Limnology

, Volume 36, Issue 3, pp 663–675 | Cite as

Wave-current interaction during Typhoon Nuri (2008) and Hagupit (2008): an application of the coupled ocean-wave modeling system in the northern South China Sea

  • Chen Zhang (张晨)
  • Yijun Hou (侯一筠)
  • Jian Li (李健)
Article
  • 73 Downloads

Abstract

The northern South China Sea (SCS) is frequently affected by typhoons. During severe storm events, wave-current interactions produce storm surges causing enormous damage in the path of the typhoon. To evaluate the influence of wave-current interactions on storm surge, we used a coupled ocean-atmospherewave- sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system with radiation-stress and vortex-force formulations to simulate two typically intense tropical storms that invaded the SCS, namely Typhoons Nuri (2008) and Hagupit (2008), and compared results with observations from the Hong Kong Observatory. Both radiationstress and vortex-force formulations significantly improved the accuracy of the simulation. Depending on which typhoon and the topography encountered, the influence of surface waves on the oceanic circulation showed different characteristics, including the differences of range and intensity of storm surge between vortex-force and radiation-stress experiments. During typhoon landing, strong sea-surface elevation in concert with wave set-up/set-down caused the adjustment of the momentum balance. In the direction perpendicular to the current, but especially in the cross-shore direction, the pressure gradient and wave effects on the current dominated the momentum balance.

Keyword

northern South China Sea wave-current interactions storm surge coupled ocean-atmospherewave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system 

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Copyright information

© Chinese Society for Oceanology and Limnology, Science Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chen Zhang (张晨)
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yijun Hou (侯一筠)
    • 2
    • 5
  • Jian Li (李健)
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Institute of OceanologyChinese Academy of SciencesQingdaoChina
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Ocean Circulation and Waves, Institute of OceanologyChinese Academy of SciencesQingdaoChina
  3. 3.University of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  4. 4.North China Sea Branch of State Oceanic AdministrationQingdaoChina
  5. 5.Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and TechnologyQingdaoChina

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