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Gender gap in articles published in European Radiology and CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology: evolution between 2002 and 2016

  • Chloé Bernard
  • Romain Pommier
  • Valérie Vilgrain
  • Maxime RonotEmail author
Hepatobiliary-Pancreas
  • 6 Downloads

Abstract

Objectives

To evaluate gender differences in the authorship of articles published in two major European radiology journals, European Radiology (EurRad) and CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology (CVIR).

Methods

A retrospective bibliometric analysis was performed of 2632 papers published in EurRad and CVIR sampled over a period of 14 years (2002–2016). The authors’ gender was determined. The analysis was focused on first and last authors. In addition, the characteristics of the articles (type, origin, radiological subspecialty, and country) were noted.

Results

Overall, 23% of first authors and 10% of the last authors were women. The proportion of women significantly increased over time in EurRad from 22% in 2002 to 35% in 2016 for first authors (p > 0.001), and from 13% in 2002 to 18% in 2016 for last authors (p = 0.05). There was no significant increase in the proportion of female authors in CVIR over time. Female authors were more frequently identified in breast imaging (48%), pediatrics, and gynecological imaging (29%). There were more female authors in articles from Spain (34%), the Netherlands (28%), France, Italy, and South Korea (26%). Forty-one percent and 21% of women were first authors with a woman or man as last author, respectively (p < 0.001).

Conclusion

There was a significant increase in female authorship in original diagnostic but not interventional imaging research articles between 2002 and 2016, with a strong influence of the radiological subspecialty. Women were significantly more frequently first authors when the last author was a woman.

Key Points

• There was a significant increase in female authorship in original diagnostic but not interventional imaging research articles between 2002 and 2016.

• There is a strong influence of the radiological subspecialty on the percentage of female authors.

• Women are significantly more frequently first authors when the last author is a woman.

Keywords

Female Authorship Radiology Bibliometrics Publishing/statistics 

Abbreviations

CVIR

CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology

EurRad

European Radiology

Notes

Funding

The authors state that this work has not received any funding.

Compliance with ethical standards

Guarantor

The scientific guarantor of this publication is Maxime Ronot.

Conflict of interest

The authors of this manuscript declare no relationships with any companies, whose products or services may be related to the subject matter of the article.

Statistics and biometry

No complex statistical methods were necessary for this paper.

Informed consent

Not applicable

Ethical approval

Not applicable

Methodology

• retrospective

• cross-sectional study

• performed at one institution

Supplementary material

330_2019_6390_MOESM1_ESM.docx (3.9 mb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 3992 kb)

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Copyright information

© European Society of Radiology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of RadiologyUniversity Hospitals Paris Nord Val de SeineClichyFrance
  2. 2.University Paris DiderotParisFrance
  3. 3.INSERM U1149, Centre de Recherche Biomédicale Bichat-BeaujonParisFrance

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