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World Journal of Surgery

, Volume 43, Issue 2, pp 360–367 | Cite as

Healthcare Leaders Develop Strategies for Expanding National Surgical, Obstetric, and Anaesthesia Plans in WHO AFRO and EMRO Regions

  • Katherine AlbuttEmail author
  • Kristin Sonderman
  • Isabelle Citron
  • Mzaza Nthele
  • Abebe Bekele
  • Emmanuel Makasa
  • Sarah Maongezi
  • Emile Rwamasirabo
  • Emmanuel Ameh
  • Hery Harimanitra Andriamanjato
  • Ahmed SA ElSayed
  • Isaac Smalle
  • Prosper Tumusiime
  • Martin Ekeke Monono
  • John G. Meara
  • Walter Johnson
Surgery in Low and Middle Income Countries

Abstract

Background

Worldwide, five billion people lack access to safe, affordable surgical, obstetric, and anaesthesia (SOA) care when needed. In many countries, a growing commitment to SOA care is culminating in the development of national surgical, obstetric, and anaesthesia plans (NSOAPs) that are fully embedded in the National Health Strategic Plan. This manuscript highlights the content and outputs from a World Health Organization (WHO) lead workshop that supported country-led plans for improving SOA care as a component of health system strengthening.

Methods

In March 2018, a group of 79 high-level global SOA stakeholders from 25 countries in the WHO AFRO and EMRO regions gathered in Dubai to provide technical and strategic guidance for the creation and expansion of NSOAPs.

Results

Drawing on the experience and expertise of represented countries that are at different stages of the NSOAP process, topics covered included (1) the global burden of surgical, obstetric, and anaesthetic conditions; (2) the key principles and components of NSOAP development; (3) the critical evaluation and feasibility of different models of NSOAP implementation; and (4) innovative financing mechanisms to fund NSOAPs.

Conclusions

Lessons learned include: (1) there is unmet need for the establishment of an NSOAP community in order to provide technical support, expertise, and mentorship at a regional level; (2) data should be used to inform future priorities, for monitoring and evaluation and to showcase advances in care following NSOAP implementation; and (3) SOA health system strengthening must be uniquely prioritized and not hidden within other health strategies.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This workshop was made possible through contributions from the Harvard Medical School Center for Global Health Delivery—Dubai and the Program in Global Surgery and Social Change at Harvard Medical School.

Authors’ contribution

All authors have provided substantial contributions to the conception or design of the work or the acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data for the work, drafted the work or revised it critically for important intellectual content, approved the version to be published, and agreed to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved. Portions of this manuscript were presented in National Surgical Obstetric and Anaesthesia Planning: Process and Consensus Recommendations.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Société Internationale de Chirurgie 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katherine Albutt
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Kristin Sonderman
    • 1
    • 3
  • Isabelle Citron
    • 1
  • Mzaza Nthele
    • 4
  • Abebe Bekele
    • 5
  • Emmanuel Makasa
    • 6
  • Sarah Maongezi
    • 7
  • Emile Rwamasirabo
    • 8
  • Emmanuel Ameh
    • 9
  • Hery Harimanitra Andriamanjato
    • 10
  • Ahmed SA ElSayed
    • 11
  • Isaac Smalle
    • 12
  • Prosper Tumusiime
    • 13
  • Martin Ekeke Monono
    • 13
  • John G. Meara
    • 1
  • Walter Johnson
    • 14
  1. 1.Program in Global Surgery and Social ChangeHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of General SurgeryMassachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA
  3. 3.Brigham and Women’s HospitalBostonUSA
  4. 4.Zambian Ministry of HealthLusakaZambia
  5. 5.Addis Ababa UniversityAddis AbabaEthiopia
  6. 6.Permanent Mission of the Republic of Zambia to the United NationsLusakaZambia
  7. 7.Tanzania Ministry of HealthDar es SalaamTanzania
  8. 8.King Faisal HospitalKigaliRwanda
  9. 9.Department of SurgeryNational HospitalAbujaNigeria
  10. 10.Ministère de la Santé PubliqueAntananarivoMadagascar
  11. 11.Alazhari Health Research CenterAlzaeim Alazhari UniversityKhartoum NorthSudan
  12. 12.Ministry of Health and SanitationFreetownSierra Leone
  13. 13.WHO Regional Office for AfricaBrazzavilleRepublic of Congo
  14. 14.Emergency & Essential Surgical Care ProgrammeWorld Health OrganizationGenevaSwitzerland

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