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World Journal of Surgery

, Volume 43, Issue 2, pp 513–518 | Cite as

Usefulness of Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using the CyberKnife for Patients with Inoperable Locoregional Recurrences of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

  • Takayuki IshigakiEmail author
  • Takashi Uruno
  • Tomoaki Tanaka
  • Yuna Ogimi
  • Chie Masaki
  • Junko Akaishi
  • Kiyomi Y. Hames
  • Tomonori Yabuta
  • Akifumi Suzuki
  • Chisato Tomoda
  • Kenichi Matsuzu
  • Keiko Ohkuwa
  • Wataru Kitagawa
  • Mitsuji Nagahama
  • Kiminori Sugino
  • Koichi Ito
Original Scientific Report (including Papers Presented at Surgical Conferences)
  • 91 Downloads

Abstract

Background

Surgical resection is the preferred treatment for locoregional recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). However, some recurrences are unresectable because of their aggressive invasion or severe adhesions. On the other hand, stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) enables high-dose irradiation to target lesions, and its usefulness for various cancers has been reported. The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of SRT as salvage treatment for locoregional recurrence of DTC.

Methods

Between August 2011 and December 2017, 52 locoregional recurrent lesions in 31 patients with recurrent DTC were treated by SRT using the CyberKnife system. Information on the adverse events associated with SRT was retrospectively collected from the patients’ medical records. Of the 52 lesions, 33 could be evaluated for therapeutic effectiveness by follow-up CT, and response was assessed using the RECIST criteria.

Results

Twenty-five patients had papillary carcinoma, 5 had follicular carcinoma, and 1 had poorly differentiated cancer. SRT was delivered in one to 20 fractions, and the median dose was 30 Gy (range 15–60 Gy). Adverse events were not frequent, but 1 patient developed bilateral vocal cord palsy that required emergent tracheostomy. The median follow-up period of 33 lesions was 14 months (range 1–54 months). Complete response, partial response, stable disease, and progressive disease were seen in 10, 11, 9, and 3 patients, respectively. The 3-year local control rate was 84.6%.

Conclusion

SRT using the CyberKnife system was found to be a feasible and effective treatment to suppress the growth of locoregional recurrence of DTC.

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Société Internationale de Chirurgie 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takayuki Ishigaki
    • 1
  • Takashi Uruno
    • 1
  • Tomoaki Tanaka
    • 1
  • Yuna Ogimi
    • 1
  • Chie Masaki
    • 1
  • Junko Akaishi
    • 1
  • Kiyomi Y. Hames
    • 1
  • Tomonori Yabuta
    • 1
  • Akifumi Suzuki
    • 1
  • Chisato Tomoda
    • 1
  • Kenichi Matsuzu
    • 1
  • Keiko Ohkuwa
    • 1
  • Wataru Kitagawa
    • 1
  • Mitsuji Nagahama
    • 1
  • Kiminori Sugino
    • 1
  • Koichi Ito
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryIto HospitalTokyoJapan

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