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Surgeon-Manipulated Live Surgery Video Recording Apparatuses: Personal Experience and Review of Literature

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Abstract

Background

Visual recording of surgical procedures is a method that is used quite frequently in practices of plastic surgery. While presentations containing photographs are quite common in education seminars and congresses, video-containing presentations find more favour. For this reason, the presentation of surgical procedures in the form of real-time video display has increased especially recently. Appropriate technical equipment for video recording is not available in most hospitals, so there is a need to set up external apparatus in the operating room. Among these apparatuses can be listed such options as head-mounted video cameras, chest-mounted cameras, and tripod-mountable cameras. The head-mounted video camera is an apparatus that is capable of capturing high-resolution and detailed close-up footage. The tripod-mountable camera enables video capturing from a fixed point. Certain user-specific modifications can be made to overcome some of these restrictions. Among these modifications, custom-made applications are one of the most effective solutions.

Methods

The article makes an attempt to present the features and experiences concerning the use of a combination of a head- or chest-mounted action camera, a custom-made portable tripod apparatus of versatile features, and an underwater camera.

Results

The descriptions we used are quite easy-to-assembly, quickly installed, and inexpensive apparatuses that do not require specific technical knowledge and can be manipulated by the surgeon personally in all procedures.

Conclusion

The author believes that video recording apparatuses will be integrated more to the operating room, become a standard practice, and become more enabling for self-manipulation by the surgeon in the near future.

Level of Evidence V

This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

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Author information

Correspondence to Emin Kapi.

Ethics declarations

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Human and Animals Rights Statement

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by the author.

Additional information

38th National Congress of Turkish Society of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery.

Electronic supplementary material

Below is the link to the electronic supplementary material.

Video 1, Supplemental Digital Content 1: A sample of the brow lifting operation recording made with the head-mounted camera (2x accelerated capture) (MOV 2294 kb)

Video 2, Supplemental Digital Content 2; A sample of the video close-up video recording made from the distal edge of the operation table in rhinoplasty operations in order to obtain basal images (2x accelerated capture) (WMV 3560 kb)

Video 3, Supplemental Digital Content 3; A video recording sample of the upper part of the face made with the versatile tripod in an eyelid operation (2x accelerated capture) (MOV 2367 kb)

Video 1, Supplemental Digital Content 1: A sample of the brow lifting operation recording made with the head-mounted camera (2x accelerated capture) (MOV 2294 kb)

Video 2, Supplemental Digital Content 2; A sample of the video close-up video recording made from the distal edge of the operation table in rhinoplasty operations in order to obtain basal images (2x accelerated capture) (WMV 3560 kb)

Video 3, Supplemental Digital Content 3; A video recording sample of the upper part of the face made with the versatile tripod in an eyelid operation (2x accelerated capture) (MOV 2367 kb)

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Cite this article

Kapi, E. Surgeon-Manipulated Live Surgery Video Recording Apparatuses: Personal Experience and Review of Literature. Aesth Plast Surg 41, 738–746 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00266-017-0826-y

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Keywords

  • Head-mounted action camera
  • Monopod
  • Self-manipulation
  • Surgical video recording
  • Tripod
  • Waterproof camera